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Asia: Thailand, Indonesia & Malaysia/Norwegian Jewel
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Norwegian Jewel

Asia: Thailand, Indonesia & Malaysia - 14 night cruise



Cruise only from €1,915

Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Description

Gratuities

Dates and Prices

As the namesake of our "Jewel Class" cruise ships, you can bet Norwegian Jewel has it all. As well as offering some of the largest suites at sea, there are staterooms to accommodate every style. When it comes to entertainment, this ship's filled with excitement: a large variety of dining options, vibrant bars and nightclubs, and that's just the beginning. Come aboard and venture into the wild on an Alaska Cruise. Go from scenic views to city views on an Asia Cruise. Toss your timetable to the breeze on a Caribbean cruise. Explore old traditions and stunning towns when you cruise to the Mexican Riviera. Or experience unique and immersive itineraries on an Extraordinary Journey. Whichever destination you choose, get ready for the adventure of a lifetime!

Exquisitely Refurbished

We've revamped everything from the carpets to the chandeliers and created brand new places and spaces in our most extensive ship renovation yet. Unwind in luxury and enjoy the breathtaking views from your spacious balcony in the new, exquisitely finished Haven Deluxe Owner's Suites. The brand-new Pit Stop, a 1950's American bar, takes you back to the era when classic cars sported chrome finishes. And dance the night away at Bliss Ultra Lounge, the newest hot spot on the club scene. Come aboard the newly polished Norwegian Jewel and see what makes her shine.

We are confident that you will enjoy your Freestyle Cruising experience and that our entire crew will provide you with the standard of service for which we are known. A discretionary service charge will be automatically added per guest per day (for guests three years and older) to your shipboard account for all staterooms: all ships US$ 16 per guest per day (for guests 3 years and older) for Studios, Inside, Oceanview and Balcony Staterooms. For Club Balcony Suites, the service charge will be US$ 18 per guest per day (for guests 3 years and older) and for Suites and The Haven Suites as well as the Concierge staterooms, the service charge will be US$ 20 per guest per day (for guests 3 years and older). This charge will be shared amongst those staff members, including the restaurant staff, stateroom stewards and other behind-the scenes staff who provide services that enhance your overall cruise experience.

These service charges can be paid in advance of your cruise. If you have any concerns about the service you receive during your cruise, please let our on-board Guest Services Desk staff know right away, so we can address any issues in a timely manner. In the unlikely event that we can't resolve your issue, you can have the service charge adjusted on board. Where your service charge has been pre-paid before departure, refunds are not available on board and you must apply for a refund, if applicable, after you return home by writing to our Guest Relations department.

Certain staff positions (e.g., concierge, butler, youth programme staff and beverage service) provide service on an individual basis to only some guests and do not benefit from the overall service charge. We encourage those guests to acknowledge good service from these staff members with appropriate gratuities.

Additionally, there is a 20% gratuity and spa service charge added for all spa and salon services, as well as a 20% gratuity and beverage service charge added for all beverage purchases and a 20% gratuity and speciality service charge added to all speciality restaurant dining and entertainment based dining e.g. Cirque Dreams® and Dinner (does not apply to Free at Sea dining and drinks packages).

Date Time Price * Booking
22 December 2023 20:00 €1,915 Call us to book

* Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Itinerary*


Day 1 Laem Chabang, Thailand

There are two Bangkoks, the ancient soul of Thailand with its long and fascinating history and the frantic, modern metropolis that embraces the latest trends both Eastern and Western. The two blend together remarkably well—even the most jarring juxtapositions of old and new somehow make sense. Bangkok is not only the biggest city in Thailand, but also the most mesmerizing, with some of the country's most beautiful temples and shrines. The city's energy is palpable, especially at night, when traffic opens up a bit, its famous markets get going, and everything seems lit up—from its proudest monuments to its seediest streets. When Ayutthaya was besieged and pillaged by the Burmese in 1766, Thonburi became Thailand's capital. The Thais call Bangkok Krung Thep (City of Angels), and in 1782 King Rama I moved his capital here, just across the Chao Praya River. Laem Chabang is approximately 130 km (81 mi) from Bangkok.

Day 2 Ko Samui, Thailand

Koh Samui is the most popular tourist destination on the Western Gulf coast, which isn't surprising, considering the island's gorgeous beaches, perfect weather, and sparkling blue, almost turquoise, water. Koh Samui has seen rapid development since the 1990s, and you'll encounter hotels in all price ranges.Koh Samui is half the size of Phuket, so you could easily drive around it in a day. But Koh Samui is best appreciated by those who take a slower, more casual approach. Most people come for the sun and sea, so they head straight to their hotel and rarely venture beyond its beach. But it's worth exploring beyond your lodging. Every beach has its own character, and you might find the perfect one for you. One beach many visitors find to their liking is Chawaeng. On Koh Samui's east coast, this stretch of glistening white sand is divided into two main sections—Chawaeng Yai (yai means "big") and Chawaeng Noi (noi means "little"). You'll find the greatest variety of hotels, restaurants, and bars here. Despite the crowds, Chawaeng is no Pattaya or Patong—the mood is very laid-back. A rocky headland separates Chawaeng Lamai Beach, whose clear water and long stretch of sand were the first place on the island to attract developers. More budget accommodations are available here than in Chawaeng, and there are some happening nightclubs.On the west coast of Koh Samui, Na Thon is the island's primary port and the spot where ferries arrive from the mainland. It's home to the island's governmental offices, including the Tourism Authority of Thailand, and there are banks, foreign-exchange booths, travel agents, shops, restaurants, and cafés by the ferry pier. A few places rent rooms, but there's really no reason to stay here—nicer accommodations can be found a short songthaew ride away.To the north and east of Na Thon lie a few beaches worthy of exploration. Laem Yai, 5 km (3 miles) north, has great seafood. East of here, a small headland separates two low-key communities on the northern shore, Mae Nam and Bophut Beach. Mae Nam is also the departure point for boats bound for Koh Phangan and Koh Tao . Just south of the Samui's northeastern tip you'll find sandy Choengmon Beach, a good area for swimming that's not overdeveloped.

Day 3 Phú Qu?c, Vietnam

Day 4  Cruising

Day 5 Bintan Island, Indonesia

Day 6 Port Klang, Malaysia

Kuala Lumpur, or KL as locals refer to it, intrigues visitors with its diversity and multicultural character. The city's old quarter features stretches of shop houses that hint at its colonial past, while modern buildings—including the iconic Petronas Towers—give a glimpse of its modern financial ambitions. The city is filled with culturally colorful quarters dedicated to Chinese, Malay, and Indian communities. New shopping malls with designer labels, five-star hotels, and top-notch restaurants also proliferate in this bustling city of 1.6 million.

Days 7-8  Cruising

Day 9 Celukan Bawang, Bali, Indonesia

Day 10 Lembar, Lombok, Indonesia

Day 11 Benoa, Bali, Indonesia

Bali really is as alluring as everyone says. This island, slightly bigger than Delaware, has it all: beaches, volcanoes, terraced rice fields, forests, renowned resorts, surfing, golf, and world-class dive sites. But what sets Bali apart from other nearby tropical destinations is Balinese tradition, and villagers dedicated to celebrating it. The hundreds of temples, dances, rituals, and crafts linked to their ancient Hindu faith aren't a show for tourists, but a living, breathing culture in which visitors are warmly received by the Balinese, who cherish their own identities.

Day 12 Benoa, Bali, Indonesia

Bali really is as alluring as everyone says. This island, slightly bigger than Delaware, has it all: beaches, volcanoes, terraced rice fields, forests, renowned resorts, surfing, golf, and world-class dive sites. But what sets Bali apart from other nearby tropical destinations is Balinese tradition, and villagers dedicated to celebrating it. The hundreds of temples, dances, rituals, and crafts linked to their ancient Hindu faith aren't a show for tourists, but a living, breathing culture in which visitors are warmly received by the Balinese, who cherish their own identities.

Day 13  Cruising

Day 14 Singapore, Singapore

The main island of Singapore is shaped like a flattened diamond, 42 km (26 miles) east to west and 23 km (14 miles) north to south. Near the northern peak is the causeway leading to West Malaysia—Kuala Lumpur is less than four hours away by car. It is at the southern foot where you will find most of the city-state's action, with its gleaming office towers, working docks, and futuristic "supertrees," which are solar-powered and serve as vertical gardens. Offshore are Sentosa and over 60 smaller islands, most uninhabited, that serve as bases for oil refining or as playgrounds and beach escapes from the city. To the east is Changi International Airport, connected to the city by metro, bus, and a tree-lined parkway. Of the island's total land area, more than half is built up, with the balance made up of parkland, farmland, plantations, swamp areas, and rain forest. Well-paved roads connect all parts of the island, and Singapore city has an excellent, and constantly expanding, public transportation system. The heart of Singapore's history and its modern wealth are in and around the Central Business District. The area includes the skyscrapers in the Central Business District, the 19th-century Raffles Hotel, the convention centers of Marina Square, on up to the top of Ft. Canning. Although most of old Singapore has been knocked down to make way for the modern city, most colonial landmarks have been preserved in the CBD, including early-19th-century buildings designed by the Irish architect George Coleman.

Day 15 Singapore, Singapore

The main island of Singapore is shaped like a flattened diamond, 42 km (26 miles) east to west and 23 km (14 miles) north to south. Near the northern peak is the causeway leading to West Malaysia—Kuala Lumpur is less than four hours away by car. It is at the southern foot where you will find most of the city-state's action, with its gleaming office towers, working docks, and futuristic "supertrees," which are solar-powered and serve as vertical gardens. Offshore are Sentosa and over 60 smaller islands, most uninhabited, that serve as bases for oil refining or as playgrounds and beach escapes from the city. To the east is Changi International Airport, connected to the city by metro, bus, and a tree-lined parkway. Of the island's total land area, more than half is built up, with the balance made up of parkland, farmland, plantations, swamp areas, and rain forest. Well-paved roads connect all parts of the island, and Singapore city has an excellent, and constantly expanding, public transportation system. The heart of Singapore's history and its modern wealth are in and around the Central Business District. The area includes the skyscrapers in the Central Business District, the 19th-century Raffles Hotel, the convention centers of Marina Square, on up to the top of Ft. Canning. Although most of old Singapore has been knocked down to make way for the modern city, most colonial landmarks have been preserved in the CBD, including early-19th-century buildings designed by the Irish architect George Coleman.

* Itinerary is subject to change. The exact itinerary can be confirmed at the time of booking.

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