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Genoa,Civitavecchia,Palermo,Valletta,Barcelona,Marseille,Genoa/MSC World Europa
Cruise holidays   >   Mediterranean and Europe   >   Genoa,Civitavecchia,Palermo,Valletta,Barcelona,Marseille,Genoa

MSC World Europa

Genoa,Civitavecchia,Palermo,Valletta,Barcelona,Marseille,Genoa - 7 night cruise



Cruise only from €638

Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Description

Highlights

Gratuities

Dates and Prices

Imagine the future of cruising on board the new revolutionary MSC World Europa, the first ship in the trailblazing MSC World class fleet.

LNG powered – one of the world's cleanest marine fuels, and featuring breakthrough green technologies MSC World Europa symbolizes the beginning of a new era of cruising. Yet another example of MSC Cruises' firm long-term environmental commitment and responsibility to the future, this unique prototype features a ground-breaking design, where every detail is conceived to offer you a taste of a new cruising experience.

It's a class of emotions, for a ship never seen before.

LNG-powered

MSC World Europa is the first LNG-propelled ship in the MSC Cruises fleet and features a new generation wastewater treatment system, as well other cutting-edge environmental technology: another significant step forward in MSC's commitment to environmental stewardship.

MSC World Europa features breakthrough green technologies and brings MSC's fleet a lot closer to the ultimate goal of “zero emissions operations”.

The LNG-powered engines ensure:

  • 99% reduction of SOx emissions1
  • 85% reduction of NOx emissions1
  • 25% reduction in greenhouse gasses (GHG)
  • Major elimination of particulate matter in exhaust

SERVICE CHARGES / GRATUITIES

Service Charge / Gratuities are included in the cruise fare.

Onboard bar purchases will incur a 15% bar service charge, automatically added to your final bill.

Tips

MSC Cruises does not recommend tipping individual members of staff.

Date Time Price * Booking
05 November 2023 08:00 €697 Call us to book
12 November 2023 08:00 €697 Call us to book
19 November 2023 08:00 €697 Call us to book
26 November 2023 08:00 €697 Call us to book
03 December 2023 08:00 €697 Call us to book
10 December 2023 08:00 €697 Call us to book
17 December 2023 08:00 €638 Call us to book
24 December 2023 08:00 €952 Call us to book
31 December 2023 08:00 €1,103 Call us to book
07 January 2024 08:00 €697 Call us to book
14 January 2024 08:00 €638 Call us to book
21 January 2024 08:00 €638 Call us to book
28 January 2024 08:00 €638 Call us to book
04 February 2024 08:00 €697 Call us to book
11 February 2024 08:00 €697 Call us to book
18 February 2024 08:00 €697 Call us to book
25 February 2024 08:00 €697 Call us to book
03 March 2024 08:00 €755 Call us to book
10 March 2024 08:00 €755 Call us to book
17 March 2024 08:00 €755 Call us to book
24 March 2024 08:00 €755 Call us to book
31 March 2024 08:00 €871 Call us to book

* Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Itinerary*


Day 1 Genoa, Italy

Genoa is a port city in the Northwest of Italy. Home to the Genoa Aquarium, famous for having the largest exposition of biodiversity in Europe, the city is also a great place to visit for anyone interested in architecture.

Day 2 Civitavecchia, Italy

Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here. Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

Day 3 Palermo, Italy

Once the intellectual capital of southern Europe, Palermo has always been at the crossroads of civilization. Favorably situated on a crescent-shaped bay at the foot of Monte Pellegrino, it has attracted almost every culture touching the Mediterranean world. To Palermo's credit, it has absorbed these diverse cultures into a unique personality that is at once Arab and Christian, Byzantine and Roman, Norman and Italian. The city's heritage encompasses all of Sicily's varied ages, but its distinctive aspect is its Arab-Norman identity, an improbable marriage that, mixed in with Byzantine and Jewish elements, created some resplendent works of art. No less noteworthy than the architecture is Palermo's chaotic vitality, on display at some of Italy's most vibrant outdoor markets, public squares, street bazaars, and food vendors, and above all in its grand climax of Italy's most spectacular passeggiata (the leisurely social stroll along the principal thoroughfare).

Day 4 Valletta, Malta

Malta's capital, the minicity of Valletta, has ornate palaces and museums protected by massive fortifications of honey-color limestone. Houses along the narrow streets have overhanging wooden balconies for people-watching from indoors. Generations ago they gave housebound women a window on the world of the street. The main entrance to town is through the City Gate (where all bus routes end), which leads onto Triq Repubblika (Republic Street), the spine of the grid-pattern city and the main shopping street. Triq Mercante (Merchant Street) parallels Repubblika to the east and is also good for strolling. From these two streets, cross streets descend toward the water; some are stepped. Valletta's compactness makes it ideal to explore on foot. City Gate and the upper part of Valletta are experiencing vast redevelopment that includes a new Parliament Building and open-air performance venue. The complex, completed mid-2013, has numerous pedestrian detours in place along with building noise and dust. Before setting out along Republic Street, stop at the tourist information office on Merchant Street for maps and brochures.

Day 5  Cruising

Day 6 Barcelona, Spain

The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.

Day 7 Marseille, France

Since being designated a European Capital of Culture for 2013, with an estimated €660 million of funding in the bargain, Marseille has been in the throes of an extraordinary transformation, with no fewer than five major new arts centers, a beautifully refurbished port, revitalized neighborhoods, and a slew of new shops and restaurants. Once the underdog, this time-burnished city is now welcoming an influx of weekend tourists who have colonized entire neighborhoods and transformed them into elegant pieds-à-terre (or should we say, mer). The second-largest city in France, Marseille is one of Europe's most vibrant destinations. Feisty and fond of broad gestures, it is also as complicated and as cosmopolitan now as it was when a band of Phoenician Greeks first sailed into the harbor that is today's Vieux Port in 600 BC. Legend has it that on that same day a local chieftain's daughter, Gyptis, needed to choose a husband, and her wandering eyes settled on the Greeks' handsome commander Protis. Her dowry brought land near the mouth of the Rhône, where the Greeks founded Massalia, the most important Continental shipping port in antiquity. The port flourished for some 500 years as a typical Greek city, enjoying the full flush of classical culture, its gods, its democratic political system, its sports and theater, and its naval prowess. Caesar changed all that, besieging the city in 49 BC and seizing most of its colonies. In 1214 Marseille was seized again, this time by Charles d'Anjou, and was later annexed to France by Henri IV in 1481, but it was not until Louis XIV took the throne that the biggest transformations of the port began; he pulled down the city walls in 1666 and expanded the port to the Rive Neuve (New Riverbank). The city was devastated by plague in 1720, losing more than half its population. By the time of the Revolution, Marseille was on the rebound once again, with industries of soap manufacturing and oil processing flourishing, encouraging a wave of immigration from Provence and Italy. With the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869, Marseille became the greatest boomtown in 19th-century Europe. With a large influx of immigrants from areas as exotic as Tangiers, the city quickly acquired the multicultural population it maintains to this day.

Day 8 Genoa, Italy

Genoa is a port city in the Northwest of Italy. Home to the Genoa Aquarium, famous for having the largest exposition of biodiversity in Europe, the city is also a great place to visit for anyone interested in architecture.

* Itinerary is subject to change. The exact itinerary can be confirmed at the time of booking.

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