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Northern Europe: Norway & British Isles/Norwegian Star
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Norwegian Star

Northern Europe: Norway & British Isles - 12 night cruise



Cruise only from €1,223

Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Description

Gratuities

Dates and Prices

Recently refurbished as part of The Norwegian Edge programme, Norwegian Star brings freedom and flexibility to cruises spanning the Mediterranean, Northern Europe, South America, and Transatlantic. Onboard, Norwegian Star features a large delicious dining options, bars and lounges, a sprawling spa, an always-exciting casino with VIP area, plus tonnes of fun for kids of every age.

Norwegian Star Reintroduced

If you think you know Norwegian Star, think again. Recently refurbished as part of The Norwegian Edge programme, the ship underwent extensive enhancements to its staterooms, public spaces, restaurants, bars and lounges.

We are confident that you will enjoy your Freestyle Cruising experience and that our entire crew will provide you with the standard of service for which we are known. A discretionary service charge will be automatically added per guest per day (for guests three years and older) to your shipboard account for all staterooms: all ships US$ 16 per guest per day (for guests 3 years and older) for Studios, Inside, Oceanview and Balcony Staterooms. For Club Balcony Suites, the service charge will be US$ 18 per guest per day (for guests 3 years and older) and for Suites and The Haven Suites as well as the Concierge staterooms, the service charge will be US$ 20 per guest per day (for guests 3 years and older). This charge will be shared amongst those staff members, including the restaurant staff, stateroom stewards and other behind-the scenes staff who provide services that enhance your overall cruise experience.

These service charges can be paid in advance of your cruise. If you have any concerns about the service you receive during your cruise, please let our on-board Guest Services Desk staff know right away, so we can address any issues in a timely manner. In the unlikely event that we can't resolve your issue, you can have the service charge adjusted on board. Where your service charge has been pre-paid before departure, refunds are not available on board and you must apply for a refund, if applicable, after you return home by writing to our Guest Relations department.

Certain staff positions (e.g., concierge, butler, youth programme staff and beverage service) provide service on an individual basis to only some guests and do not benefit from the overall service charge. We encourage those guests to acknowledge good service from these staff members with appropriate gratuities.

Additionally, there is a 20% gratuity and spa service charge added for all spa and salon services, as well as a 20% gratuity and beverage service charge added for all beverage purchases and a 20% gratuity and speciality service charge added to all speciality restaurant dining and entertainment based dining e.g. Cirque Dreams® and Dinner (does not apply to Free at Sea dining and drinks packages).

Date Time Price * Booking
31 May 2023 16:00 €1,223 Call us to book

* Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Itinerary*


Day 1 Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain's largest cruise port. It has been one of England's major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Day 2  Cruising

Day 3 Newhaven/Edinburgh, Scotland

Newhaven is a district in the City of Edinburgh, Scotland, between Leith and Granton and about 2 miles north of the city centre, just north of the Victoria Park district. Formerly a village and harbour on the Firth of Forth.

Day 4 Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland

In bustling Kirkwall, the main town on Orkney, there's plenty to see in the narrow, winding streets extending from the harbor. The cathedral and some museums are highlights.

Day 5 Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland

Founded by Dutch fishermen in the 17th century, Lerwick today is a busy town and administrative center. Handsome stone buildings—known as lodberries—line the harbor; they provided loading bays for goods, some of them illegal. The town's twisting flagstone lanes and harbor once heaved with activity, and Lerwick is still an active port today. This is also where most visitors to Shetland dock, spilling out of cruise ships, allowing passengers to walk around the town.

Day 6 Olden, Norway

See the aqua blue ice of the Jostedal Glacier cascading down the stunning Oldedalen Valley, as you navigate the spindly fjords of Norway. Feel your breath catching in your throat, as you sail into this world of wonder, and the dramatic fjord scenery and interlocking valleys inspire you. The village of Olden opens up some of Norway's most majestic natural wonders, from the glacier - which is mainland Europe's largest - to the sloshing waterfalls that run off it, and the bowing forests that sway all around it. A visit to picturesque Olden is all thrilling panoramas and hikes through wildflower sprinkled trails. The Briksdalsbreen arm of ice, reaches out from the main glacier, and sits around an hour's stroll from the village of Olden itself - regular busses can also take you there. Snaking through steep-sided valleys, you can enjoy a walk close to the foot of the ice, and feel the spray of the waterfalls that plummet nearby, as you breathe in some of the freshest air you've ever tasted. The crisp glacial meltwater is so clean and pure that it's bottled up to be sold across Norway.

Day 7 Ålesund, Norway

The coastal town of Ålesund is the commercial capital of the Møre og Romsdal district. But more important, it is noted for its characteristic Jugendstil (Art Nouveau) buildings, which some claim make Ålesund one of the most beautiful towns in Norway. This Art Nouveau style emerged when the town was completely rebuilt after a devastating fire in 1904 destroyed nearly 800 buildings and left 10,000 residents homeless. It is said that the fire started by a tipped oil lamp. Rebuilding was carried out with the help of many young, foreign architects who added their own flourishes to the architectural blend of German Jugendstil and Viking roots. Today, narrow streets are crammed with buildings topped with turrets, spires and gables that bear decorations of dragonheads and curlicues. As one of the few remaining Art Nouveau towns in the world, in 1998 Ålesund was awarded the coveted Houens National Memorial Prize for the preservation of its unique architecture.

Day 8 Trondheim, Norway

One of Scandinavia's oldest cities, Trondheim was the first capital of Norway, from AD 997 to 1380. Founded in 997 by Viking king Olav Tryggvason, it was first named Nidaros (still the name of the cathedral), a composite word referring to the city's location at the mouth of the Nidelva River. Today, it's Central Norway's largest (and Norway's third largest) city, with a population of 150,000. The wide streets of the historic city center remain lined with brightly painted wood houses and striking warehouses. But it's no historic relic: it's also the home to NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) and is Norway's technological capital.

Day 9 Sandnessjøen, Norway

Day 10 Narvik, Norway

At 68 degrees North, Narvik lies 140 miles inside the Arctic Circle. Its history as a settlement began in the Stone Age, and Vikings are also known to have lived in the area. The modern town came into existence in the 1870s to serve the needs of the iron industry. Iron ore is mined in neighbouring Sweden and, as an ice-free port, Narvik was chosen as the ideal export location. The LKAB mining corporation is still a major employer and landowner in the area, shipping some 25,000,000 tons of iron ore from the port annually. This industrial heritage has shaped the town and now forms the basis of some of its most popular tourist attractions. In 1883 a co-owned British-Swedish company was given permission to build a railway connecting the Swedish iron mines in Kiruna to Narvik. It opened in 1902 and the town, then christened Victoriahavn, grew up around it. Unfortunately much of Narvik was destroyed in World War II. Invaded by the Nazis on 9 April 1940, it was later retaken by the Allies, representing the first military defeat of Hitler's troops, but was evacuated as part of Operation Alphabet when it came under German occupation again. The local war museum documents the turbulent history of this period.

Day 11 Svolvær, Norway

Day 12 Tromsø, Norway

With its centre located on the island of Tromsø, the municipality of Tromsø is more than five times the size of Norway's capital, Oslo, and is the world's northernmost university city. Lying 200 miles inside the Arctic Circle, it is known as the 'Gateway to the Arctic' because it was used as a starting point for hunters looking for Arctic foxes, polar bears and seals. In the 19th century it was a base for explorers on Arctic expeditions – a history that is remembered in the city's Polar Museum, which you can visit on an excursion. Also commemorated in the area is the history of Norway's indigenous people, the Sami. Visitors can learn about the traditions, heritage and modern preservation of the Sami culture at the Tromsø Museum. Nowadays, Tromsø is a charming mix of old and new, with wooden buildings sitting alongside contemporary architecture such as the impressive glacier-like Arctic Cathedral, which features one of the largest stained glass windows in Europe. Looking down on the city is Mount Storsteinen, and a cable car runs to the top, giving wonderful views over the surrounding countryside of forested peaks and reindeer pastures.

Day 13 Tromsø, Norway

With its centre located on the island of Tromsø, the municipality of Tromsø is more than five times the size of Norway's capital, Oslo, and is the world's northernmost university city. Lying 200 miles inside the Arctic Circle, it is known as the 'Gateway to the Arctic' because it was used as a starting point for hunters looking for Arctic foxes, polar bears and seals. In the 19th century it was a base for explorers on Arctic expeditions – a history that is remembered in the city's Polar Museum, which you can visit on an excursion. Also commemorated in the area is the history of Norway's indigenous people, the Sami. Visitors can learn about the traditions, heritage and modern preservation of the Sami culture at the Tromsø Museum. Nowadays, Tromsø is a charming mix of old and new, with wooden buildings sitting alongside contemporary architecture such as the impressive glacier-like Arctic Cathedral, which features one of the largest stained glass windows in Europe. Looking down on the city is Mount Storsteinen, and a cable car runs to the top, giving wonderful views over the surrounding countryside of forested peaks and reindeer pastures.

* Itinerary is subject to change. The exact itinerary can be confirmed at the time of booking.

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