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Seward (Anchorage to Vancouver/Silver Muse
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Silver Muse

Seward (Anchorage to Vancouver - 7 night cruise



Cruise only from €3,614

Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Description

Gratuities

Dates and Prices

Cabins

Silver Muse is our inspirational work of art. With her eight dining venues, spacious outdoor areas and up-to-the-minute technology, she's the best place between sea and sky.

Silver Muse marked a new era of ultra-luxury ocean travel for us - enhancing the small-ship intimacy and spacious all-suite accommodation that are our hallmarks but raising the bar in terms of luxury. Silver Muse offers a wealth of enhancements to the onboard experience while satisfying our uncompromising requirements for comfort, service, dining and quality of the world's most discerning travellers.

Cruise ID: 18289

Setting sail on Silversea promises peace of mind from start to finish. That means no worrying about tipping the butlers or staff. Our crew-to-guest ratio of almost 1:1 ensures flawless service from pole to pole, but with us, you never have to think about who should get a tip, how much you should give and when. It's all included! We believe that not having to deal with tipping helps make your luxury cruise even more special and stress-free. And that is worth every penny.

Date Time Price * Booking
06 June 2024 19:00 €4,458 Call us to book
20 June 2024 19:00 €3,614 Call us to book
08 August 2024 19:00 €3,735 Call us to book

* Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.

Cabins on Silver Muse

Silver Suite
1-5

Step onto your terrace and bask in the calm feeling of the ocean breeze. Dissolve into the comfort of your king size bed. Prepare for the evening in the beautiful marble bathroom. The upper deck location gives the most spectacular of sea views, the spacious living area allows for comfortable relaxing where cosy nights in become veritable experiences in themselves. The two-bedroom configuration of this suite makes this it the ideal option for families.

One bedroom: 73 sq.m. including veranda

Images are intended as a general reference. Features, materials, finishes and layout may be different than shown.

Please note that the 3rd guest will sleep on a comfortable sofa bed in the reception area of the suite.

Two bedroom: 104 sq.m. including veranda

Wheelchair accessible suite: 931

Essentials

  • Deck(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Section: Forward, Mid-Ship

Characteristics

  • Veranda
  • Living room with sitting area
  • Double vanity
  • Separate shower
  • Whirlpool bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe

Furniture

  • King size bed
  • Writing desk
  • Vanity table
  • Luxury bed mattresses

Media & Communication

  • Unlimited Premium Wi-Fi
  • 2 large flat screen TVs with Interactive Media Library
  • Sound system with bluetooth connectivity
  • Direct dial telephone
  • Wall mounted USB-C mobile device chargers
  • Dual voltage 110/220 outlets

Onboard Services

  • Butler service
  • Complimentary laundry, pressing & wet cleaning
  • Daily canape service, Welcome chocolate, Welcome fruit stand
  • Champagne on arrival

Amenities

  • Espresso machine
  • Pillow menu
  • Refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your preferences
  • Plush bathrobe
  • Luxury bath amenities
  • Umbrella
  • Hair Dryer
  • Slippers

Facilities

  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Lounge Area
  • Vanity Area
  • Shower
  • Suite Benefits
  • Full Bar
  • Butler Service
  • Media/Entertainment Station
  • Coffee Machine
  • Pillow Menu Available
  • Telephone
  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Second Bedroom
  • Sofa Bed
  • Whirlpool Bath
  • Free Mini Bar

Vista Suite
1-2

The Vista Suite provides generous living space for all travellers. The Vista Suite offers all the comfort and attention to detail that you can expect aboard. A generous expanse of interior comforts — elegant décor, stunning marble bathroom and ample seating area, make this a cosy home away from home. The seating area of the Vista Suite has plenty of room to relax, while large picture windows frame panoramic ocean views, the perfect backdrop for breakfast in bed! 3 Wheelchair Accessible Suites (407, 409, 417)

One bedroom: 32 sq.m.

Wheelchair accessible suites: 407, 409, 417

Images are intended as a general reference. Features, materials, finishes and layout may be different than shown.

Essentials

  • Deck(s): 4
  • Section: Forward

Characteristics

  • Window
  • Sitting area
  • Standard vanity
  • Separate shower
  • Full-size bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe

Furniture

  • Queen size bed
  • Writing desk
  • Luxury bed mattresses

Media & Communication

  • Unlimited Standard Wi-Fi
  • 1 large flat screen TV with Interactive Media Library
  • Direct dial telephone
  • Wall mounted USB-C mobile device chargers
  • Dual voltage 110/220 outlets

Onboard Services

  • Butler service
  • Champagne on arrival

Amenities

  • Pillow menu
  • Refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your preferences
  • Plush bathrobe
  • Luxury bath amenities
  • Umbrella
  • Hair Dryer
  • Slippers

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Lounge Area
  • Vanity Area
  • Suite Benefits
  • Butler Service
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • Media/Entertainment Station
  • Pillow Menu Available
  • Telephone
  • Bath
  • Free Mini Bar

Owner's Suite
1-5

Picture yourself taking a delicious breakfast on your private veranda. Imagine watching the sun set, a flute of chilled champagne in hand, setting sail for your next destination. Prestigious, classic and sophisticated, this stylish apartment suite offers the ultimate in finest accommodation on board. Set aside for those who seek a superlative level of space, comfort and service, the Owner's Suite has it all. The adjoining bedroom, with its en-suite bathroom, offers its own spectacular sea views.

One bedroom: 88-98 sq.m. including veranda

Two bedroom: 119-129 sq.m. including veranda*

*The difference in size is largely due to a larger entry corridor space and does not concern the living or sleeping area.

Images are intended as a general reference. Features, materials, finishes and layout may be different than shown.

Please note that the 3rd guest will sleep on a comfortable sofa bed in the reception area of the suite.

Essentials

  • Deck(s): 9
  • Section: Mid-Ship

Characteristics

  • Veranda
  • Separate dining area
  • Living room with sitting area
  • Double vanity
  • Separate shower
  • Whirlpool bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe

Furniture

  • King size bed
  • Writing desk
  • Vanity table
  • Luxury bed mattresses

Media & Communication

  • Unlimited Premium Wi-Fi
  • 2 large flat screen TVs with Interactive Media Library
  • Sound system with bluetooth connectivity
  • Direct dial telephone
  • Wall mounted USB-C mobile device chargers
  • Dual voltage 110/220 outlets

Onboard Services

  • Butler service
  • Complimentary laundry, pressing & wet cleaning
  • Daily canape service, Welcome chocolate, Welcome fruit stand
  • Dinner for two in La Dame, one evening per voyage,
  • Two hours of worldwide phone use, per voyage segment
  • Champagne on arrival

Amenities

  • Espresso machine
  • Pillow menu
  • Refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your preferences
  • Plush bathrobe
  • Luxury bath amenities
  • Umbrella
  • Hair Dryer
  • Slippers

Facilities

  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • Suite Benefits
  • TV
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Dining Area
  • Vanity Area
  • Full Bar
  • Butler Service
  • Media/Entertainment Station
  • Coffee Machine
  • Pillow Menu Available
  • Telephone
  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Second Bedroom
  • Sofa Bed
  • Whirlpool Bath
  • Free Mini Bar

Grand Suite
1-5

Indulge in the epitome of ultra-luxury cruising. The Grand Suite is for those who want to experience sailing in style. The sophistication of the Silversea philosophy coupled with ample interior and exterior space makes this the perfect choice for serious travellers. With the biggest verandas on board, enjoy entertaining new friends or simply sharing intimate meals while contemplating spectacular sunsets. Savour the sense of well-being offered by the luxurious furnishings and modern amenities. Offering an unprecedented level of relaxation, the Grand Suite is the perfect romantic getaway.

One bedroom: 137-146 sq.m. including veranda

Two bedroom: 174-183 sq.m. including veranda

Images are intended as a general reference. Features, materials, finishes and layout may be different than shown.

Please note that the 3rd guest will sleep on a comfortable sofa bed in the reception area of the suite.

Essentials

  • Deck(s): 8, 9
  • Section: Forward

Characteristics

  • Veranda
  • Separate dining area
  • Living room with sitting area
  • Double vanity
  • Separate shower
  • Whirlpool bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe

Furniture

  • King size bed
  • Writing desk
  • Vanity table
  • Luxury bed mattresses

Media & Communication

  • Unlimited Premium Wi-Fi
  • 2 large flat screen TVs with Interactive Media Library
  • Sound system with bluetooth connectivity
  • Direct dial telephone
  • Wall mounted USB-C mobile device chargers
  • Dual voltage 110/220 outlets

Onboard Services

  • Butler service
  • Complimentary laundry, pressing & wet cleaning
  • Daily canape service, Welcome chocolate, Welcome fruit stand
  • Dinner for two in La Dame, one evening per voyage,
  • Two hours of worldwide phone use, per voyage segment
  • Champagne on arrival

Amenities

  • Espresso machine
  • Pillow menu
  • Refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your preferences
  • Plush bathrobe
  • Luxury bath amenities
  • Umbrella
  • Hair Dryer
  • Slippers

Facilities

  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Dining Area
  • Vanity Area
  • Suite Benefits
  • Full Bar
  • Butler Service
  • Media/Entertainment Station
  • Coffee Machine
  • Pillow Menu Available
  • Telephone
  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Whirlpool Bath
  • Free Mini Bar

Royal Suite
1-4

Designed with the values of the culture of living in mind, the Royal Suite offers a vast, eloquent space. Precise lines, authentic Italian craftsmanship and fine materials make up just some of the details of this stunning suite. Commanding and majestic, the Royal Suite boasts a lavish living area perfect for entertaining, plush interior furnishings and sweeping seascapes from the private terrace. The comfort of the spacious apartment makes this the ideal space for those wanting to feel the true comfort and luxury of the Silversea philosophy.

One bedroom: 105 sq.m. including veranda

Two bedroom: 142 sq.m. including veranda

Images are intended as a general reference. Features, materials, finishes and layout may be different than shown. Front bedroom windows partially obstructed by deck equipment.

Please note that the 3rd guest will sleep on a comfortable sofa bed in the reception area of the suite.

Essentials

  • Deck(s): 7
  • Section: Forward

Characteristics

  • Veranda
  • Separate dining area
  • Living room with sitting area
  • Double vanity
  • Separate shower
  • Whirlpool bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe

Furniture

  • King size bed
  • Writing desk
  • Vanity table
  • Luxury bed mattresses

Media & Communication

  • Unlimited Premium Wi-Fi
  • 2 large flat screen TVs with Interactive Media Library
  • Sound system with bluetooth connectivity
  • Direct dial telephone
  • Wall mounted USB-C mobile device chargers
  • Dual voltage 110/220 outlets

Onboard Services

  • Butler service
  • Complimentary laundry, pressing & wet cleaning
  • Daily canape service, Welcome chocolate, Welcome fruit stand
  • Dinner for two in La Dame, one evening per voyage,
  • Two hours of worldwide phone use, per voyage segment
  • Champagne on arrival

Amenities

  • Espresso machine
  • Pillow menu
  • Refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your preferences
  • Plush bathrobe
  • Luxury bath amenities
  • Umbrella
  • Hair Dryer
  • Slippers

Facilities

  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Lounge Area
  • Dining Area
  • Vanity Area
  • Suite Benefits
  • Full Bar
  • Butler Service
  • Media/Entertainment Station
  • Coffee Machine
  • Pillow Menu Available
  • Telephone
  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Second Bedroom
  • Sofa Bed
  • Whirlpool Bath
  • Free Mini Bar

Deluxe Veranda Suite
1-3

The Deluxe Veranda Suite offers a comfortable living space, close to the heart of the ship. With its preferred mid-ship location and all the comfort and attention to detail that you can expect aboard, the Deluxe Veranda Suite is the savvy traveller's paradise— both inside and out. Elegant décor, stunning marble bathroom and ample seating area, make this a cosy home away from home. But perhaps this suite's finest asset lies just outside, as floor-to-ceiling glass doors open onto a private veranda, making every sunset feel as if it is yours alone.

One bedroom: 36 sq.m. including veranda

Images are intended as a general reference. Features, materials, finishes and layout may be different than shown.

Please note that the 3rd guest will sleep on a comfortable sofa bed in the reception area of the suite.


Essentials

  • Deck(s): 6, 7, 8
  • Section: Mid-Ship

Characteristics

  • Veranda
  • Sitting area
  • Standard vanity
  • Separate shower
  • Full-size bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe

Furniture

  • Queen size bed
  • Writing desk
  • Luxury bed mattresses

Media & Communication

  • Unlimited Standard Wi-Fi
  • 1 large flat screen TV with Interactive Media Library
  • Direct dial telephone
  • Wall mounted USB-C mobile device chargers
  • Dual voltage 110/220 outlets

Onboard Services

  • Butler service
  • Champagne on arrival

Amenities

  • Pillow menu
  • Refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your preferences
  • Plush bathrobe
  • Luxury bath amenities
  • Umbrella
  • Hair Dryer
  • Slippers

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Lounge Area
  • Vanity Area
  • Suite Benefits
  • Butler Service
  • Media/Entertainment Station
  • Pillow Menu Available
  • Telephone
  • Sofa Bed
  • Free Mini Bar

Superior Veranda Suite
1-3

Located on the upper deck, and offering spectacular sunset views, the Superior Veranda Suite has all the comforts and luxury that you can expect aboard. A comfortable living space, attention to detail and a generous expanse of amenities, this stunning suite makes for a cosy home while on the seas. But perhaps this suite's finest asset lies just outside, as floor-to-ceiling glass doors open onto a private veranda, making every sunset feel as if it is yours alone.

One bedroom: 36 sq.m. including veranda

Images are intended as a general reference. Features, materials, finishes and layout may be different than shown.

Please note that the 3rd guest will sleep on a comfortable sofa bed in the reception area of the suite.


Essentials

  • Deck(s): 7, 8, 9
  • Section: Forward

Characteristics

  • Veranda
  • Sitting area
  • Standard vanity
  • Separate shower
  • Full-size bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe

Furniture

  • Queen size bed
  • Writing desk
  • Luxury bed mattresses

Media & Communication

  • Unlimited Standard Wi-Fi
  • 1 large flat screen TV with Interactive Media Library
  • Direct dial telephone
  • Wall mounted USB-C mobile device chargers
  • Dual voltage 110/220 outlets

Onboard Services

  • Butler service
  • Champagne on arrival

Amenities

  • Pillow menu
  • Refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your preferences
  • Plush bathrobe
  • Luxury bath amenities
  • Umbrella
  • Hair Dryer
  • Slippers

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Vanity Area
  • Suite Benefits
  • Butler Service
  • Media/Entertainment Station
  • Pillow Menu Available
  • Telephone
  • Bath
  • Sofa Bed
  • Free Mini Bar

Classic Veranda Suite
1-2

The Classic Veranda Suite provides generous living space for voyagers. Located lower bow, the Classic Veranda Suite offers all the comfort and attention to detail that you can expect aboard — both inside and out. A generous expanse of interior comforts — elegant décor, stunning marble bathroom and ample seating area, make this a cosy home away from home. But perhaps this suite's finest asset lies just outside, as floor-to-ceiling glass doors open onto a private veranda, making every sunset feel as if it is yours alone.

One bedroom: 36 sq.m. including veranda

Images are intended as a general reference. Features, materials, finishes and layout may be different than shown.

Essentials

Deck(s): 5, 6

Section: Forward

Characteristics

  • Veranda
  • Sitting area
  • Standard vanity
  • Separate shower
  • Full-size bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe

Furniture

  • Queen size bed
  • Writing desk
  • Luxury bed mattresses

Media & Communication

  • Unlimited Standard Wi-Fi
  • 1 large flat screen TV with Interactive Media Library
  • Direct dial telephone
  • Wall mounted USB-C mobile device chargers
  • Dual voltage 110/220 outlets

Onboard Services

  • Butler service
  • Champagne on arrival

Amenities

  • Pillow menu
  • Refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your preferences
  • Plush bathrobe
  • Luxury bath amenities
  • Umbrella
  • Hair Dryer
  • Slippers

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • Safe
  • Desk
  • Vanity Area
  • Suite Benefits
  • Butler Service
  • Media/Entertainment Station
  • Hair Dryer
  • Pillow Menu Available
  • Telephone
  • Free Mini Bar

Panorama Suite
1-2

The Panorama Suite provides generous living space for voyagers. Located on deck 9, the Panorama offers all the comfort and attention to detail that you can expect aboard. A generous expanse of interior comforts — elegant décor, stunning marble bathroom and ample seating area, make this a cosy home away from home. The seating area of the Panorama Suite has plenty of room to relax, while large picture windows frame panoramic ocean views.

One bedroom: 31 sq.m.

Images are intended as a general reference. Features, materials, finishes and layout may be different than shown.

Essentials

  • Deck(s): 9
  • Section: Forward

Characteristics

  • Floor-to ceiling window
  • Sitting area
  • Standard vanity
  • Separate shower
  • Full-size bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe

Furniture

  • Queen size bed
  • Writing desk
  • Luxury bed mattresses

Media & Communication

  • Unlimited Standard Wi-Fi
  • 1 large flat screen TV with Interactive Media Library
  • Direct dial telephone
  • Wall mounted USB-C mobile device chargers
  • Dual voltage 110/220 outlets

Onboard Services

  • Butler service
  • Champagne on arrival

Amenities

  • Pillow menu
  • Refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your preferences
  • Plush bathrobe
  • Luxury bath amenities
  • Umbrella
  • Hair Dryer
  • Slippers

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Lounge Area
  • Vanity Area
  • Suite Benefits
  • Butler Service
  • Media/Entertainment Station
  • Pillow Menu Available
  • Telephone
  • Bath
  • Free Mini Bar

View Itinerary By Date



Day 1 Seward, Alaska, United States

It is hard to believe that a place as beautiful as Seward exists. Surrounded on all sides by Kenai Fjords National Park, Chugach National Forest, and Resurrection Bay, Seward offers all the quaint realities of a small railroad town with the bonus of jaw-dropping scenery. This little town of about 2,750 citizens was founded in 1903, when survey crews arrived at the ice-free port and began planning a railroad to the Interior. Since its inception, Seward has relied heavily on tourism and commercial fishing. It is also the launching point for excursions into Kenai Fjords National Park, where it is quite common to see marine life and calving glaciers.

Day 2  Cruising

Day 3 Juneau, Alaska, United States

Juneau, Alaska's capital and third-largest city, is on the North American mainland but can't be reached by road. Bounded by steep mountains and water, the city's geographic isolation and compact size make it much more akin to an island community such as Sitka than to other Alaskan urban centers, such as Fairbanks or Anchorage. Juneau is full of contrasts. Its dramatic hillside location and historic downtown buildings provide a frontier feeling, but the city's cosmopolitan nature comes through in fine museums, noteworthy restaurants, and a literate and outdoorsy populace. The finest of the museums, the Alaska State Museum, is scheduled to reopen in May 2016 on its old site as the expanded Alaska State Library, Archives, and Museum (SLAM) following several years of planning and exhibit research. Another new facility, the Walter Soboleff Center, offers visitors a chance to learn about the indigenous cultures of Southeast Alaska–-Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian. Other highlights include the Mt. Roberts Tramway, plenty of densely forested wilderness areas, quiet bays for sea kayaking, and even a famous drive-up glacier, Mendenhall Glacier. For goings-on, pick up the Juneau Empire (www.juneauempire.com), which keeps tabs on state politics, business, sports, and local news.

Day 4 Haines, Alaska, United States

Unlike most cities of Southeast Alaska, Haines can be reached by road. With a population of 2,200, Haines lies in the upper northern reaches of the Inside Passage and is an important access point to the Yukon Territory and Interior Alaska. While cruising into Haines, see the Lynn Canal, the longest and deepest fjord in North America. Once in town, mountains seem to surround you on all sides while the jagged cathedral peaks of the Chilkat Mountains loom over Fort Seward. Haines has two distinct personalities. On the north side of the Haines Highway is the section of Haines that developed around the Presbyterian mission. After its missionary beginnings, it served as the trailhead for the Jack Dalton Trail into the Yukon during the 1897 gold rush to the Klondike. South of the highway, the town resembles a military post, which is exactly what it was for nearly half a century. In 1903 the U.S. Army established Fort William Henry Seward at Portage Cove just south of town. The post (renamed Chilkoot Barracks in 1922) was the only military base in the territory until World War II. In 1939, the army built the Alaska Highway and the Haines Highway to connect Alaska with the other states. Today, the community of Haines is recognized for the Native American dance and culture center at Fort Seward as well as for its superb fishing, camping and outdoor recreation.

Day 5 Sitka, Alaska, United States

It's hard not to like Sitka, with its eclectic blend of Alaska Native, Russian, and American history and its dramatic and beautiful open-ocean setting. This is one of the best Inside Passage towns to explore on foot, with St. Michael's Cathedral, Sheldon Jackson Museum, Castle Hill, Sitka National Historical Park, and the Alaska Raptor Center topping the must-see list.Sitka was home to the Kiksádi clan of the Tlingit people for centuries prior to the 18th-century arrival of the Russians under the direction of territorial governor Alexander Baranof, who believed the region was ideal for the fur trade. The governor also coveted the Sitka site for its beauty, mild climate, and economic potential; in the island's massive timber forests he saw raw materials for shipbuilding. Its location offered trading routes as far west as Asia and as far south as California and Hawaii. In 1799 Baranof built St. Michael Archangel—a wooden fort and trading post 6 miles north of the present town.Strong disagreements arose shortly after the settlement. The Tlingits attacked the settlers and burned their buildings in 1802. Baranof, however, was away in Kodiak at the time. He returned in 1804 with a formidable force—including shipboard cannons—and attacked the Tlingits at their fort near Indian River, site of the present-day 105-acre Sitka National Historical Park, forcing many of them north to Chichagof Island.By 1821 the Tlingits had reached an accord with the Russians, who were happy to benefit from the tribe's hunting skills. Under Baranof and succeeding managers, the Russian-American Company and the town prospered, becoming known as the Paris of the Pacific. The community built a major shipbuilding and repair facility, sawmills, and forges, and even initiated an ice industry, shipping blocks of ice from nearby Swan Lake to the booming San Francisco market. The settlement that was the site of the 1802 conflict is now called Old Sitka. It is a state park and listed as a National Historic Landmark.The town declined after its 1867 transfer from Russia to the United States, but it became prosperous again during World War II, when it served as a base for the U.S. effort to drive the Japanese from the Aleutian Islands. Today its most important industries are fishing, government, and tourism.

Day 6 Wrangell, Alaska, United States

A small, unassuming timber and fishing community, Wrangel sits on the northern tip of Wrangel Island, near the mouth of the fast-flowing Stikine River—North America's largest undammed river. The Stikine plays a large role in the life of many Wrangel residents, including those who grew up homesteading on the islands that pepper the area. Trips on the river with local guides are highly recommended as they provide, basically, an insider's guide to the Stikine and a very Alaskan way of life. Like much of Southeast, Wrangel has suffered in recent years from a declining resource-based economy. But locals are working to build tourism in the town. Bearfest, which started in 2010, celebrates Wrangel's proximity to Anan Creek, where you can get a close-up view of both brown and black bears. Wrangel has flown three different national flags in its time. Russia established Redoubt St. Dionysius here in 1834. Five years later Great Britain's Hudson's Bay Company leased the southern Alaska coastline, renaming the settlement Ft. Stikine. It was rechristened Wrangel when the Americans took over in 1867; the name came from Baron Ferdinand Petrovich von Wrangel, governor of the Russian-American Company. The rough-around-the-edges town is off the track of the larger cruise ships, so it does not get the same seasonal traffic that Ketchikan and Juneau do. Hence, it is nearly devoid of the souvenir shops that dominate so many other nearby downtown areas. But the gift shops and art galleries that are here do sell locally created work, and the town is very welcoming to visitors; independent travelers would do well to add a stop in Wrangel during their Southeast wanderings.

Day 7  Cruising

Day 8 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Vancouver is a delicious juxtaposition of urban sophistication and on-your-doorstep wilderness adventure. The mountains and seascape make the city an outdoor playground for hiking, skiing, kayaking, cycling, and sailing—and so much more—while the cuisine and arts scenes are equally diverse, reflecting the makeup of Vancouver's ethnic (predominantly Asian) mosaic. Vancouver is consistently ranked as one of the world's most livable cities, and it's easy for visitors to see why. It's beautiful, it's outdoorsy, and there's a laidback West Coast vibe. On the one hand, there's easy access to a variety of outdoor activities, a fabulous variety of beaches, and amazing parks. At the same time, the city has a multicultural vitality and cosmopolitan flair. The attraction is as much in the range of food choices—the fresh seafood and local produce are some of North America's best—as it is in the museums, shopping, and nightlife.Vancouver's landscaping also adds to the city's walking appeal. In spring, flowerbeds spill over with tulips and daffodils while sea breezes scatter scented cherry blossoms throughout Downtown; in summer office workers take to the beaches, parks, and urban courtyards for picnic lunches and laptop meetings. More than 8 million visitors each year come to Vancouver, Canada's third-largest metropolitan area. Because of its peninsula location, traffic flow is a contentious issue. Thankfully, Vancouver is wonderfully walkable, especially in the downtown core. The North Shore is a scoot across the harbor, and the rapid-transit system to Richmond and the airport means that staying in the more affordable 'burbs doesn't have to be synonymous with sacrificing convenience. The mild climate, exquisite natural scenery, and relaxed outdoor lifestyle keep attracting residents, and the number of visitors is increasing for the same reasons. People often get their first glimpse of Vancouver when catching an Alaskan cruise, and many return at some point to spend more time here.

Day 1 Seward, Alaska, United States

It is hard to believe that a place as beautiful as Seward exists. Surrounded on all sides by Kenai Fjords National Park, Chugach National Forest, and Resurrection Bay, Seward offers all the quaint realities of a small railroad town with the bonus of jaw-dropping scenery. This little town of about 2,750 citizens was founded in 1903, when survey crews arrived at the ice-free port and began planning a railroad to the Interior. Since its inception, Seward has relied heavily on tourism and commercial fishing. It is also the launching point for excursions into Kenai Fjords National Park, where it is quite common to see marine life and calving glaciers.

Day 2  Cruising

Day 3 Juneau, Alaska, United States

Juneau, Alaska's capital and third-largest city, is on the North American mainland but can't be reached by road. Bounded by steep mountains and water, the city's geographic isolation and compact size make it much more akin to an island community such as Sitka than to other Alaskan urban centers, such as Fairbanks or Anchorage. Juneau is full of contrasts. Its dramatic hillside location and historic downtown buildings provide a frontier feeling, but the city's cosmopolitan nature comes through in fine museums, noteworthy restaurants, and a literate and outdoorsy populace. The finest of the museums, the Alaska State Museum, is scheduled to reopen in May 2016 on its old site as the expanded Alaska State Library, Archives, and Museum (SLAM) following several years of planning and exhibit research. Another new facility, the Walter Soboleff Center, offers visitors a chance to learn about the indigenous cultures of Southeast Alaska–-Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian. Other highlights include the Mt. Roberts Tramway, plenty of densely forested wilderness areas, quiet bays for sea kayaking, and even a famous drive-up glacier, Mendenhall Glacier. For goings-on, pick up the Juneau Empire (www.juneauempire.com), which keeps tabs on state politics, business, sports, and local news.

Day 4 Haines, Alaska, United States

Unlike most cities of Southeast Alaska, Haines can be reached by road. With a population of 2,200, Haines lies in the upper northern reaches of the Inside Passage and is an important access point to the Yukon Territory and Interior Alaska. While cruising into Haines, see the Lynn Canal, the longest and deepest fjord in North America. Once in town, mountains seem to surround you on all sides while the jagged cathedral peaks of the Chilkat Mountains loom over Fort Seward. Haines has two distinct personalities. On the north side of the Haines Highway is the section of Haines that developed around the Presbyterian mission. After its missionary beginnings, it served as the trailhead for the Jack Dalton Trail into the Yukon during the 1897 gold rush to the Klondike. South of the highway, the town resembles a military post, which is exactly what it was for nearly half a century. In 1903 the U.S. Army established Fort William Henry Seward at Portage Cove just south of town. The post (renamed Chilkoot Barracks in 1922) was the only military base in the territory until World War II. In 1939, the army built the Alaska Highway and the Haines Highway to connect Alaska with the other states. Today, the community of Haines is recognized for the Native American dance and culture center at Fort Seward as well as for its superb fishing, camping and outdoor recreation.

Day 5 Sitka, Alaska, United States

It's hard not to like Sitka, with its eclectic blend of Alaska Native, Russian, and American history and its dramatic and beautiful open-ocean setting. This is one of the best Inside Passage towns to explore on foot, with St. Michael's Cathedral, Sheldon Jackson Museum, Castle Hill, Sitka National Historical Park, and the Alaska Raptor Center topping the must-see list.Sitka was home to the Kiksádi clan of the Tlingit people for centuries prior to the 18th-century arrival of the Russians under the direction of territorial governor Alexander Baranof, who believed the region was ideal for the fur trade. The governor also coveted the Sitka site for its beauty, mild climate, and economic potential; in the island's massive timber forests he saw raw materials for shipbuilding. Its location offered trading routes as far west as Asia and as far south as California and Hawaii. In 1799 Baranof built St. Michael Archangel—a wooden fort and trading post 6 miles north of the present town.Strong disagreements arose shortly after the settlement. The Tlingits attacked the settlers and burned their buildings in 1802. Baranof, however, was away in Kodiak at the time. He returned in 1804 with a formidable force—including shipboard cannons—and attacked the Tlingits at their fort near Indian River, site of the present-day 105-acre Sitka National Historical Park, forcing many of them north to Chichagof Island.By 1821 the Tlingits had reached an accord with the Russians, who were happy to benefit from the tribe's hunting skills. Under Baranof and succeeding managers, the Russian-American Company and the town prospered, becoming known as the Paris of the Pacific. The community built a major shipbuilding and repair facility, sawmills, and forges, and even initiated an ice industry, shipping blocks of ice from nearby Swan Lake to the booming San Francisco market. The settlement that was the site of the 1802 conflict is now called Old Sitka. It is a state park and listed as a National Historic Landmark.The town declined after its 1867 transfer from Russia to the United States, but it became prosperous again during World War II, when it served as a base for the U.S. effort to drive the Japanese from the Aleutian Islands. Today its most important industries are fishing, government, and tourism.

Day 6 Wrangell, Alaska, United States

A small, unassuming timber and fishing community, Wrangel sits on the northern tip of Wrangel Island, near the mouth of the fast-flowing Stikine River—North America's largest undammed river. The Stikine plays a large role in the life of many Wrangel residents, including those who grew up homesteading on the islands that pepper the area. Trips on the river with local guides are highly recommended as they provide, basically, an insider's guide to the Stikine and a very Alaskan way of life. Like much of Southeast, Wrangel has suffered in recent years from a declining resource-based economy. But locals are working to build tourism in the town. Bearfest, which started in 2010, celebrates Wrangel's proximity to Anan Creek, where you can get a close-up view of both brown and black bears. Wrangel has flown three different national flags in its time. Russia established Redoubt St. Dionysius here in 1834. Five years later Great Britain's Hudson's Bay Company leased the southern Alaska coastline, renaming the settlement Ft. Stikine. It was rechristened Wrangel when the Americans took over in 1867; the name came from Baron Ferdinand Petrovich von Wrangel, governor of the Russian-American Company. The rough-around-the-edges town is off the track of the larger cruise ships, so it does not get the same seasonal traffic that Ketchikan and Juneau do. Hence, it is nearly devoid of the souvenir shops that dominate so many other nearby downtown areas. But the gift shops and art galleries that are here do sell locally created work, and the town is very welcoming to visitors; independent travelers would do well to add a stop in Wrangel during their Southeast wanderings.

Day 7  Cruising

Day 8 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Vancouver is a delicious juxtaposition of urban sophistication and on-your-doorstep wilderness adventure. The mountains and seascape make the city an outdoor playground for hiking, skiing, kayaking, cycling, and sailing—and so much more—while the cuisine and arts scenes are equally diverse, reflecting the makeup of Vancouver's ethnic (predominantly Asian) mosaic. Vancouver is consistently ranked as one of the world's most livable cities, and it's easy for visitors to see why. It's beautiful, it's outdoorsy, and there's a laidback West Coast vibe. On the one hand, there's easy access to a variety of outdoor activities, a fabulous variety of beaches, and amazing parks. At the same time, the city has a multicultural vitality and cosmopolitan flair. The attraction is as much in the range of food choices—the fresh seafood and local produce are some of North America's best—as it is in the museums, shopping, and nightlife.Vancouver's landscaping also adds to the city's walking appeal. In spring, flowerbeds spill over with tulips and daffodils while sea breezes scatter scented cherry blossoms throughout Downtown; in summer office workers take to the beaches, parks, and urban courtyards for picnic lunches and laptop meetings. More than 8 million visitors each year come to Vancouver, Canada's third-largest metropolitan area. Because of its peninsula location, traffic flow is a contentious issue. Thankfully, Vancouver is wonderfully walkable, especially in the downtown core. The North Shore is a scoot across the harbor, and the rapid-transit system to Richmond and the airport means that staying in the more affordable 'burbs doesn't have to be synonymous with sacrificing convenience. The mild climate, exquisite natural scenery, and relaxed outdoor lifestyle keep attracting residents, and the number of visitors is increasing for the same reasons. People often get their first glimpse of Vancouver when catching an Alaskan cruise, and many return at some point to spend more time here.

Day 1 Seward, Alaska, United States

It is hard to believe that a place as beautiful as Seward exists. Surrounded on all sides by Kenai Fjords National Park, Chugach National Forest, and Resurrection Bay, Seward offers all the quaint realities of a small railroad town with the bonus of jaw-dropping scenery. This little town of about 2,750 citizens was founded in 1903, when survey crews arrived at the ice-free port and began planning a railroad to the Interior. Since its inception, Seward has relied heavily on tourism and commercial fishing. It is also the launching point for excursions into Kenai Fjords National Park, where it is quite common to see marine life and calving glaciers.

Day 2  Cruising

Day 3 Juneau, Alaska, United States

Juneau, Alaska's capital and third-largest city, is on the North American mainland but can't be reached by road. Bounded by steep mountains and water, the city's geographic isolation and compact size make it much more akin to an island community such as Sitka than to other Alaskan urban centers, such as Fairbanks or Anchorage. Juneau is full of contrasts. Its dramatic hillside location and historic downtown buildings provide a frontier feeling, but the city's cosmopolitan nature comes through in fine museums, noteworthy restaurants, and a literate and outdoorsy populace. The finest of the museums, the Alaska State Museum, is scheduled to reopen in May 2016 on its old site as the expanded Alaska State Library, Archives, and Museum (SLAM) following several years of planning and exhibit research. Another new facility, the Walter Soboleff Center, offers visitors a chance to learn about the indigenous cultures of Southeast Alaska–-Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian. Other highlights include the Mt. Roberts Tramway, plenty of densely forested wilderness areas, quiet bays for sea kayaking, and even a famous drive-up glacier, Mendenhall Glacier. For goings-on, pick up the Juneau Empire (www.juneauempire.com), which keeps tabs on state politics, business, sports, and local news.

Day 4 Haines, Alaska, United States

Unlike most cities of Southeast Alaska, Haines can be reached by road. With a population of 2,200, Haines lies in the upper northern reaches of the Inside Passage and is an important access point to the Yukon Territory and Interior Alaska. While cruising into Haines, see the Lynn Canal, the longest and deepest fjord in North America. Once in town, mountains seem to surround you on all sides while the jagged cathedral peaks of the Chilkat Mountains loom over Fort Seward. Haines has two distinct personalities. On the north side of the Haines Highway is the section of Haines that developed around the Presbyterian mission. After its missionary beginnings, it served as the trailhead for the Jack Dalton Trail into the Yukon during the 1897 gold rush to the Klondike. South of the highway, the town resembles a military post, which is exactly what it was for nearly half a century. In 1903 the U.S. Army established Fort William Henry Seward at Portage Cove just south of town. The post (renamed Chilkoot Barracks in 1922) was the only military base in the territory until World War II. In 1939, the army built the Alaska Highway and the Haines Highway to connect Alaska with the other states. Today, the community of Haines is recognized for the Native American dance and culture center at Fort Seward as well as for its superb fishing, camping and outdoor recreation.

Day 5 Sitka, Alaska, United States

It's hard not to like Sitka, with its eclectic blend of Alaska Native, Russian, and American history and its dramatic and beautiful open-ocean setting. This is one of the best Inside Passage towns to explore on foot, with St. Michael's Cathedral, Sheldon Jackson Museum, Castle Hill, Sitka National Historical Park, and the Alaska Raptor Center topping the must-see list.Sitka was home to the Kiksádi clan of the Tlingit people for centuries prior to the 18th-century arrival of the Russians under the direction of territorial governor Alexander Baranof, who believed the region was ideal for the fur trade. The governor also coveted the Sitka site for its beauty, mild climate, and economic potential; in the island's massive timber forests he saw raw materials for shipbuilding. Its location offered trading routes as far west as Asia and as far south as California and Hawaii. In 1799 Baranof built St. Michael Archangel—a wooden fort and trading post 6 miles north of the present town.Strong disagreements arose shortly after the settlement. The Tlingits attacked the settlers and burned their buildings in 1802. Baranof, however, was away in Kodiak at the time. He returned in 1804 with a formidable force—including shipboard cannons—and attacked the Tlingits at their fort near Indian River, site of the present-day 105-acre Sitka National Historical Park, forcing many of them north to Chichagof Island.By 1821 the Tlingits had reached an accord with the Russians, who were happy to benefit from the tribe's hunting skills. Under Baranof and succeeding managers, the Russian-American Company and the town prospered, becoming known as the Paris of the Pacific. The community built a major shipbuilding and repair facility, sawmills, and forges, and even initiated an ice industry, shipping blocks of ice from nearby Swan Lake to the booming San Francisco market. The settlement that was the site of the 1802 conflict is now called Old Sitka. It is a state park and listed as a National Historic Landmark.The town declined after its 1867 transfer from Russia to the United States, but it became prosperous again during World War II, when it served as a base for the U.S. effort to drive the Japanese from the Aleutian Islands. Today its most important industries are fishing, government, and tourism.

Day 6 Wrangell, Alaska, United States

A small, unassuming timber and fishing community, Wrangel sits on the northern tip of Wrangel Island, near the mouth of the fast-flowing Stikine River—North America's largest undammed river. The Stikine plays a large role in the life of many Wrangel residents, including those who grew up homesteading on the islands that pepper the area. Trips on the river with local guides are highly recommended as they provide, basically, an insider's guide to the Stikine and a very Alaskan way of life. Like much of Southeast, Wrangel has suffered in recent years from a declining resource-based economy. But locals are working to build tourism in the town. Bearfest, which started in 2010, celebrates Wrangel's proximity to Anan Creek, where you can get a close-up view of both brown and black bears. Wrangel has flown three different national flags in its time. Russia established Redoubt St. Dionysius here in 1834. Five years later Great Britain's Hudson's Bay Company leased the southern Alaska coastline, renaming the settlement Ft. Stikine. It was rechristened Wrangel when the Americans took over in 1867; the name came from Baron Ferdinand Petrovich von Wrangel, governor of the Russian-American Company. The rough-around-the-edges town is off the track of the larger cruise ships, so it does not get the same seasonal traffic that Ketchikan and Juneau do. Hence, it is nearly devoid of the souvenir shops that dominate so many other nearby downtown areas. But the gift shops and art galleries that are here do sell locally created work, and the town is very welcoming to visitors; independent travelers would do well to add a stop in Wrangel during their Southeast wanderings.

Day 7  Cruising

Day 8 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Vancouver is a delicious juxtaposition of urban sophistication and on-your-doorstep wilderness adventure. The mountains and seascape make the city an outdoor playground for hiking, skiing, kayaking, cycling, and sailing—and so much more—while the cuisine and arts scenes are equally diverse, reflecting the makeup of Vancouver's ethnic (predominantly Asian) mosaic. Vancouver is consistently ranked as one of the world's most livable cities, and it's easy for visitors to see why. It's beautiful, it's outdoorsy, and there's a laidback West Coast vibe. On the one hand, there's easy access to a variety of outdoor activities, a fabulous variety of beaches, and amazing parks. At the same time, the city has a multicultural vitality and cosmopolitan flair. The attraction is as much in the range of food choices—the fresh seafood and local produce are some of North America's best—as it is in the museums, shopping, and nightlife.Vancouver's landscaping also adds to the city's walking appeal. In spring, flowerbeds spill over with tulips and daffodils while sea breezes scatter scented cherry blossoms throughout Downtown; in summer office workers take to the beaches, parks, and urban courtyards for picnic lunches and laptop meetings. More than 8 million visitors each year come to Vancouver, Canada's third-largest metropolitan area. Because of its peninsula location, traffic flow is a contentious issue. Thankfully, Vancouver is wonderfully walkable, especially in the downtown core. The North Shore is a scoot across the harbor, and the rapid-transit system to Richmond and the airport means that staying in the more affordable 'burbs doesn't have to be synonymous with sacrificing convenience. The mild climate, exquisite natural scenery, and relaxed outdoor lifestyle keep attracting residents, and the number of visitors is increasing for the same reasons. People often get their first glimpse of Vancouver when catching an Alaskan cruise, and many return at some point to spend more time here.

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