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Kangerlussuaq to Nome/Silver Wind
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Silver Wind

Kangerlussuaq to Nome - 24 night cruise



Cruise only from €35,756

Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Description

Highlights

Gratuities

Dates and Prices

Break new waters with Silver Wind.

A major upgrade in December 2018 saw Silver Wind looking better than ever. A second refurbishment in November 2021 will see her benefitting from a strengthened to ice-class hull and will make her one of the most adaptable ships in our fleet. Still timelessly elegant, still luxuriously relaxed, her improved cruising versatility means she is able to whizz from the Polar Regions at the ends of the earth to the iconic ports of the Mediterranean with fluid ease. So whether you want to get up close and personal to penguins in Antarctica or laze on the golden sands of the Caribbean, get ready for a wealth of diverse destination experiences, in traditional Silversea comfort.

The newest expedition ship to join our fleet. Refurbished in November 2021, Silver Wind is an intimate yet spacious ice-class ship that offers one of the best luxury expedition cruise experiences there is.

Silversea's knowledgeable Destination Consultants have been carefully selected for their regional expertise. On most voyages, a Destination Consultant presents informal discussions about the history and culture, the highlights and must-see places of interest and where to shop or dine. He provides insight about the various shore excursions to help you make the best selection, and even accompanies some of the tours. In places like the Panama Canal or Alaska's Inside Passage, you'll hear him expounding about the sights with commentaries from the bridge. And he's also available to answer individual queries — around the ship or at a round table discussion, perhaps. Or join him at dinner and enjoy convivial conversation along with some expert advice.

All hotel service gratuities are included in your cruise fare. Gratuities for services received shoreside or in the spa are at your own discretion.

Date Time Price * Booking
21 August 2023 17:00 €35,756 Call us to book
23 August 2024 19:00 €39,244 Call us to book

* Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Itinerary*


Day 1 Kangerlussuaq Havn, Greenland

The name Kangerlussuaq means "Big Fjord" in the local Kalaallisut language. The settlement of about 500 people is located in western Greenland on flat land at the head of a fjord with the same name. Kangerlussuaq is the site of Greenland's largest commercial airport and most of the economy here is dependent on the air transportation hub and tourism. The rugged lands around the settlement support terrestrial Arctic fauna including muskoxen, caribou, and Gyrfalcons.

Day 2 Kangaamiut, Greenland

Only 350 people live in the small Greenlandic community of Kangaamiut. Located on the south coast of Timerdlit Island and facing the Davis Strait, Kangaamiut is situated between the mouths of two long fjords: the Kangerlussuatsiaq Fjord (or Evighedsfjorden in Danish) to its south and to its north Kangaamiut Kangerluarsuat Fjord. Founded in 1755, it was called “Sugarloaf” (Sukkertoppen) because of the appearance of three nearby hills

Day 3 Nuuk (Godthaab), Greenland

Nuuk, meaning “the cape”, was Greenland's first town (1728). Started as a fort and later mission and trading post some 240 kilometers south of the Arctic Circle, it is the current capital. Almost 30% of Greenland's population lives in the town. Not only does Nuuk have great natural beauty in its vicinity, but there are Inuit ruins, Hans Egede's home, the parliament, and the Church of our Saviour as well. The Greenlandic National Museum has an outstanding collection of Greenlandic traditional dresses, as well as the famous Qilakitsoq mummies. The Katuaq Cultural Center's building was inspired by the undulating Northern Lights and can house 10% of Nuuk's inhabitants.

Day 4 Sisimiut (Holsteinsborg), Greenland

Located just north of the Arctic Circle, Sisimiut is the northernmost town in Greenland where the port remains free of ice in the winter. Yet it is also the southernmost town where there is enough snow and ice to drive a dogsled in winter and spring. In Sisimiut, travelling by sled has been the primary means of winter transportation for centuries. In fact, the area has been inhabited for approximately 4,500 years. Modern Sisimiut is the largest business center in the north of Greenland, and is one of the fastest growing Greenlandic cities. Commercial fishing is the lead economy in the town‘s thriving industrial base.

Day 5 Ilulissat (Jakobshavn), Greenland

Known as the birthplace of icebergs, the Ilulissat Icefjord produces nearly 20 million tons of ice each day. In fact, the word Ilulissat means “icebergs” in the Kalaallisut language. The town of Ilulissat is known for its long periods of calm and settled weather, but the climate tends to be cold due to its proximity to the fjord. Approximately 4,500 people live in Ilulissat, the third-largest town in Greenland after Nuuk and Sisimiut. Some people here estimate that there are nearly as many sled dogs as human beings living in the town that also boasts a local history museum located in the former home of Greenlandic folk hero and famed polar explorer Knud Rasmussen.

Day 6  Cruising

Day 7 Pond Inlet, Nunavut, Canada

Located in northern Baffin Island, Pond Inlet is a small, predo¬minantly Inuit community, with a population of roughly 1,500 inhabitants. In 1818, the British explorer John Ross named a bay in the vicinity after the English astronomer John Pond. Today Pond Inlet is considered one of Canada's "jewels of the North" thanks to several picturesque glaciers and mountain ranges nearby. Many archaeological sites of ancient Dorset and Thule peoples can be found near Pond Inlet. The Inuit hunted caribou, ringed and harp seals, fish, polar bears, walrus, narwhals, geese, ptarmigans and Arctic hares, long before European and American whalers came here to harvest bowhead whales. Pond Inlet is also known as a major center of Inuit art, especially the printmaking and stone carving that are featured in the town's art galleries.

Day 8 Dundas Harbour, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada

Dundas Harbour is located in the southeast of Devon Island, Canada's 6th largest island. It is a forlorn but starkly beautiful spot. The island was first sighted by Europeans in 1616 by the English explorers Robert Bylot and William Baffin. But it did not appear on maps until after explorer William Edward Parry's exploration in the 1820's. Parry named it after Devon, England. In the local Inuktitut language, the place is called Talluruti, which translates as “a woman's chin with tattoos on it.” This refers to the deep crevasses and streaks on Devon Island, which from a distance resemble traditional facial tattoos. On land there are remains of a Thule settlement dating back to 1000 A.D., including tent rings, middens and a gravesite. There are also much more recent remains a Royal Canadian Mounted Police outpost. The first post was established in 1924 to monitor and control illegal activities, such as foreign whaling, in the eastern entrance to the Northwest Passage. But conditions were so isolated and severe that the post was abandoned in 1933. It was reopened in 1945, but again closed, this time permanently, in 1951. Today, Devon Island is the largest uninhabited island in the world.

Day 9 Beechey Island, Nunavut, Canada

Beechey Island is a small island off the southwest coast of Devon Island, separated by a narrow waterway called the Barrow Strait. Captain William Edward Parry was the first European to visit the island in 1819. His lieutenant, Frederick William Beechey, named the island after his father, the artist William Beechey (1753–1839). Beechey Island played a significant role in the history of Arctic Exploration. During the winter of 1845-46, Sir John Franklin and his men camped on the island as part of their ill-fated quest to find the Northwest Passage. Mummified remains of three of Franklin's crew were discovered, giving a better understanding of what happened before the disappearance of the expedition. In 1850 Edward Belcher used the island as a base while surveying the area. Later, in 1903, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen stopped at the island at the beginning of his successful voyage in search for the Northwest Passage. Subsequently, Beechey Island has been declared a "Territorial Historic Site" since 1975 by the Northwest Territories government

Day 10 Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada

Day 11  Cruising

Day 12 Gjoa Haven, Nunavut, Canada

Day 13 Jenny Lind Island, Nunavut, Canada

Day 14 Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, Canada

Days 15-16  Cruising

Day 17 Sachs Harbour, Northwest Territories, Canada

Day 18 Smoking Hills, Northwest Territories, Canada

Day 19  Cruising

Day 20 Herschel Island, Yukon, Canada

Days 21-22  Cruising

Day 23 Point Hope, Alaska, United States

Day 24 Port Clarence, Alaska, United States

Day 25 Nome, Alaska, United States

Nome is located on the edge of the Bering Sea, on the southwest side of the Seward Peninsula. Unlike other towns which are named for explorers, heroes or politicians, Nome was named as a result of a 50 year-old spelling error. In the 1850's an officer on a British ship off the coast of Alaska noted on a manuscript map that a nearby prominent point was not identified. He wrote "? Name" next to the point. When the map was recopied, another draftsman thought that the “?” was a C and that the “a” in "Name" was an o, and thus a map-maker in the British Admiralty christened "Cape Nome." The area has an amazing history dating back 10,000 years of Inupiaq Eskimo use for subsistence living. Modern history started in 1898 when "Three Lucky Swedes”, Jafet Lindberg, Erik Lindblom and John Brynteson, discovered gold in Anvil Creek…the rush was on! In 1899 the population of Nome swelled from a handful to 28,000. Today the population is just over 3,500. Much of Nome's gold rush architecture remains.

* Itinerary is subject to change. The exact itinerary can be confirmed at the time of booking.

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