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Pond Inlet to Reykjavik/Silver Endeavour
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Silver Endeavour

Pond Inlet to Reykjavik - 16 night cruise



Cruise only from €18,430

Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Description

Gratuities

Dates and Prices

We're proud to announce that our newest addition has joined the fleet. Built to PC6 Polar Class specifications – one of the highest Polar Class classifications there is – Silver Endeavour revolutionises our expedition voyages, and allows us to travel deeper to some of the planet's farthest flung coasts. Her statistics speak for themselves: from unrivalled, industry-leading crew-to-guest, zodiac-to-guest and expert-to-guest ratios, to cutting-edge navigation and exploration technology and hallmark Silversea comfort make her the most luxurious expedition ship ever built.

Spread over eight public decks, not only does she feature ample onboard space, multiple restaurants, plus a huge choice of bars and lounges, but her large and luxurious suites are some of the best in expedition cruising. Superbly designed, all her suites feature a balcony and our highest standards of service thanks to an impressive crew-to-guest ratio of 1:1.

All hotel service gratuities are included in your cruise fare. Gratuities for services received shoreside or in the spa are at your own discretion. 

Date Time Price * Booking
20 August 2023 20:00 €18,430 Call us to book
18 August 2024 20:00 €24,535 Call us to book

* Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Itinerary*


Day 1 Pond Inlet, Nunavut, Canada

Located in northern Baffin Island, Pond Inlet is a small, predo¬minantly Inuit community, with a population of roughly 1,500 inhabitants. In 1818, the British explorer John Ross named a bay in the vicinity after the English astronomer John Pond. Today Pond Inlet is considered one of Canada's "jewels of the North" thanks to several picturesque glaciers and mountain ranges nearby. Many archaeological sites of ancient Dorset and Thule peoples can be found near Pond Inlet. The Inuit hunted caribou, ringed and harp seals, fish, polar bears, walrus, narwhals, geese, ptarmigans and Arctic hares, long before European and American whalers came here to harvest bowhead whales. Pond Inlet is also known as a major center of Inuit art, especially the printmaking and stone carving that are featured in the town's art galleries.

Day 2 Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada

Bylot Island, off the northern end of Baffin Island has an area of 4,273 square miles, making it one of the largest uninhabited islands in the world. Cape Burney lies on the east coast of Bylot Island, and is used regularly by local Inuit during their hunting and fishing seasons. The island is named for the Arctic explorer Robert Bylot who was the first European to sight the island's steep mountains, ice fields, sheer cliffs, snowfields and glaciers in 1616. A total of 74 species of Arctic birds thrive on this island. In fact, it is such an important nesting area that the entire island has been incorporated into the Sirmilik National Park, and the eastern part of the island is federally designated as the Bylot Island Migratory Bird Sanctuary. It is also a major nesting site for birds, including Thick-billed Murres, Black-legged Kittiwakes and Greater Snow Geese.

Day 3 Buchan Gulf, Nunavut, Canada

Day 4 Sam Ford Fiord, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

The starkly beautiful Sam Ford Fjord area of Baffin Island has one of the most impressive concentrations of vertical rock walls to be found anywhere in the world. It is a 110-kilometer (68-mile) waterway lined with sheer cliffs that have attracted some of the world's best (and most extreme) rock climbers to the region. The steep stone walls were formed by ancient glaciers that carved the landscape throughout the ages. However, the feature that makes the shoreline truly special is the way that many of these walls rise straight up from the dark waters of the deep fjord. Swimming these waters are marine mammals including narwhals and seals that once attracted Inuit hunters to this coast.

Day 5 Isabella Bay, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

Day 6 Auyuittuq National Park, Canada

Picturesque park featuring hiking trails & arctic terrains, including glaciers, fjords & ice fields.

Day 7 Cape Dyer, Canada

Day 8 Kekerten Island, Nunavut, Canada

Day 9 Lady Franklin Island, Nunavut, Canada

Named in honour of Sir John Franklin's widow, the lonely and uninhabited Lady Franklin Island lies off of Baffin Island's Hall Peninsula at the entrance to Cumberland Sound. The island is named for the wife of Sir John Franklin, the Arctic explorer who died trying to discover the Northwest Passage. The geology of the island is striking with vertical cliffs of Archean rocks, likely to be some of the oldest stone in Canada. The waters around Lady Franklin Island offer an abundance seabirds, ducks, seals, and walrus. With a bit of luck it is possible to see Atlantic Puffins here and perhaps even a rare Sabine's Gull.

Day 10  Cruising

Day 11 Nuuk (Godthaab), Greenland

Nuuk, meaning “the cape”, was Greenland's first town (1728). Started as a fort and later mission and trading post some 240 kilometers south of the Arctic Circle, it is the current capital. Almost 30% of Greenland's population lives in the town. Not only does Nuuk have great natural beauty in its vicinity, but there are Inuit ruins, Hans Egede's home, the parliament, and the Church of our Saviour as well. The Greenlandic National Museum has an outstanding collection of Greenlandic traditional dresses, as well as the famous Qilakitsoq mummies. The Katuaq Cultural Center's building was inspired by the undulating Northern Lights and can house 10% of Nuuk's inhabitants.

Day 12 Hvalsey, Greenland

Northeast of Qaqortoq and at the end of a fjord, Hvalsey is one of the best examples of South Greenland's many scattered ruins from the Norse period. Today the area is used for sheep-grazing, but until the 15th century the settlement at Hvalsey, and specifically Hvalsey's church, played an important part. Christianity had spread its influence throughout Europe and eventually had reached remote Greenland, where it established itself in the country in 1000 AD. Hvalsey Church was built in the 14th century and is the best preserved of the churches in Greenland from that period. Apart from the church walls, historical ruins from the time of the Norse are just a few meters away.

Day 13 Uunartoq Qeqertaq, Greenland

Uunartoq is a small island in South Greenland a short distance east of what once was considered the largest settlement in Greenland. The island has hot springs that were renowned as far back as the days of the Norse for their healing effects. Three naturally heated streams have been channeled to flow into a knee-deep and stone-lined pool. While one unwinds by soaking in the steaming waters, one can watch icebergs that either clog the fjord to the north or come floating by.

Day 14 Prince Christian Sound, Greenland

The transit through the Sound is one of this voyage's highlights. Connecting the Labrador Sea with the Irminger Seat, Prince Christian Sound or “Prins Christian Sund” in Danish is named after Prince (later King) Christian VII (1749-1808). 100 km (60 miles ), long and at times just 500 m (1500 ft) wide, this majestic and spectacular fiord throws you back into a Viking era – flanked by soaring snow-topped mountains, rock-strewn cliffs and rolling hills, it is as if time has stood still and one easily forgets that this is the 21st century. As you marvel at the sheer size of the mountains that surround you, with the Arctic waters lapping deceptively at the hull, revel in the silence enveloping you. Icebergs float serenely by, carrying with them the ages of time. Be sure to wear warm clothing as this is one spectacle that you do not want to miss.

Day 15 Skjoldungen, Greenland

Located on Greenland's relatively rarely visited rugged east coast, Skoldungen Fjord has enchanting scenery with towering mountains tipped with snow, ice-scraped valley sides and sculptured icebergs in shades of white and blue. At the top of the fjord one can easily see the retreating state of the Thrym Glacier. The U-shaped fjord offers spectacular scenery and as an extra perk, it is not uncommon to see whales in the fjord.

Day 16  Cruising

Day 17 Reykjavík, Iceland

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

* Itinerary is subject to change. The exact itinerary can be confirmed at the time of booking.

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