Southeast Asia, Japan & Alaska Grand Adventure/Discovery Princess
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Discovery Princess

Southeast Asia, Japan & Alaska Grand Adventure - 29 night cruise



Cruise only from €4,098

Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Description

Gratuities

Dates and Prices

Cabins

Discovery Princess℠, our third vessel designed from the ground up with Princess MedallionClass™ and the final Royal-class ship, will continue to deliver an array of innovative new experiences. Enjoy 270-degree sweeping views from our largest balconies at sea, unwind in ultimate comfort at The Sanctuary, and indulge your senses with world-class dining options from Michelin-star and renowned chefs. Plus, Princess live entertainment presents spectacular new productions that can only be seen in our state-of-the-art Princess Theatre. With our effortless, personalised service of the MedallionClass® experience, your real holiday has just begun!

From the moment you step aboard, we want you to feel welcomed and right at home. And with attentive service from a friendly staff that knows what hospitality means, you'll find your Princess® ship truly is your home away from home.

Cruise ID: 32299

To simplify the tipping process for our passengers, a discretionary gratuity charge will be automatically added to your shipboard account on a daily basis. The daily gratuity amounts are $16.50 per guest for suites, $15.50 per guest for mini-suites and club class, and $14.50 per guest for interior, oceanview, and balcony staterooms. This gratuity will be shared amongst those staff who have helped provide and support your cruise experience, including all waitstaff, stateroom stewards, buffet stewards, and housekeeping staff across the fleet. A 18% gratuity is added to bar charges and dining room wine accounts. 

Date Time Price * Booking
28 September 2025 16:00 €4,098 Call us to book

* Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.

Cabins on Discovery Princess

Reserve Collection
1-4

Mini-Suite with Exclusive VIP Touches

A premium stateroom category featuring our best located Mini-Suite staterooms, as well as the great amenities found in all Mini-Suites — plus premier dining benefits and luxurious perks. Each night, enjoy Reserve Dining, an exclusive dining area featuring expedited seating with no wait, additional menu options, dedicated wait staff and tableside preparations. Other amenities include priority embarkation and disembarkation, a complimentary one-time wine set-up and so much more!^

^Includes one 750 ml bottle of wine on embarkation day^^.

^^For mini-suite guests only: A one-time set-up for a 750ml bottle of wine on embarkation day. Full-suite guests enjoy a complimentary mini-bar setup and do not receive additional bottles of wine.

Standard Amenities:

  • Approximately 323 sq. ft., including balcony
  • Balcony with 2-4 chairs, table and ottoman
  • Bathroom tub and massage shower head with upgraded amenities
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Separate sitting area with sofa bed & coffee table
  • Complimentary welcome glass of bubbly on embarkation day
  • Luxury mattress topper and pillows
  • Two flat-panel televisions
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • 24-hour room service†
  • Spacious closet
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & fine bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe
Upgraded Amenities & Services:
  • The Princess Luxury Bed
  • Priority embarkation and disembarkation at the beginning and end of your cruise
  • One-time complimentary wine set-up^
  • Evening canapés, upon request
  • Luxurious terry shawl bathrobes
Reserve Dining:*
  • Exclusive area of the Main Dining Room
  • Expedited seating with minimal to no wait
  • Additional menu options
  • Dedicated waitstaff
  • Uniquely-styled décor (Premium table linens only)
  • Table-side preparations

?3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.

†Guests may call for room service delivery or order through OceanNow® in the Princess® Cruises app at any time of the day or night. Guests with the latest Princess Plus and Princess Premier packages enjoy OceanNow® and room service delivery with no charge. Otherwise, a one-time access fee of $14.99 USD per person per voyage will apply for OceanNow® delivery and a $5 USD room service fee will apply for each order placed by stateroom phone. Limitations, restrictions and conditions apply.

^Includes one 750 ml bottle of wine on embarkation day.

*Open every evening for dinner. Open for breakfast and lunch on sea days.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Mini-Suite
1-4

Add an Element of Luxury to Your Stay

Choose a luxurious Mini-Suite with balcony which is substantially larger than a Balcony stateroom and receive a complimentary welcome glass of bubbly. Mini-Suites include a separate sitting area with sofa bed and two flat-panel televisions. For families or groups needing a little extra space, Mini-Suites offer an appealing and affordable option.

  • Approximately 323 sq. ft., including balcony
  • Balcony with 2-4 chairs, table and ottoman
  • Bathroom tub and massage shower head
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Separate sitting area with sofa bed & coffee table
  • Complimentary welcome glass of bubbly on embarkation day
  • Luxury mattress topper and pillows
  • Two flat-panel televisions
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • 24-hour room service†
  • Spacious closet
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe

?3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.

†Guests may call for room service delivery or order through OceanNow® in the Princess® Cruises app at any time of the day or night. Guests with the latest Princess Plus and Princess Premier packages enjoy OceanNow® and room service delivery with no charge. Otherwise, a one-time access fee of $14.99 USD per person per voyage will apply for OceanNow® delivery and a $5 USD room service fee will apply for each order placed by stateroom phone. Limitations, restrictions and conditions apply.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Dining Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk
  • Suite Benefits
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Suite
1-4

Most Luxurious Accommodations at Sea

Surrounding you with deluxe accommodations, a spacious Suite with balcony includes all the amenities of a Reserve Collection Mini-Suite^^, plus incredible premiums. Enjoy more living space, a sofa bed and separate seating areas, and wonderfully enhanced amenities that range from priority embarkation and disembarkation to a complimentary mini-bar setup in suite and so much more.

Includes all the fine amenities of a spacious Reserve Collection Mini-Suite plus:

  • Approx. 440 to 1,500 sq. ft., including balcony
  • Luxury balcony furniture including 2 loungers, 4 chairs, table and ottoman
  • 2 floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Separate sitting area with sofa bed, chair and 2 tables
  • One complimentary mini-bar setup and free daily bottled water
  • Spacious closet
  • Complimentary laundry and professional cleaning services
  • Complimentary Specialty Dining Dinner on embarkation evening^
  • Priority specialty dining and shore excursion reservation
  • Priority disembarkation at tender ports
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator
  • Two flat-panel televisions
  • Private bathroom with tub and separate shower
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • 24-hour room service†
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & fine bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe

? 3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.

^ Applicable on cruises six days or longer. Reservations can be made once onboard your ship.

† Guests may call for room service delivery or order through OceanNow® in the Princess® Cruises app at any time of the day or night. Guests with the latest Princess Plus and Princess Premier packages enjoy OceanNow® and room service delivery with no charge. Otherwise, a one-time access fee of $14.99 USD per person per voyage will apply for OceanNow® delivery and a $5 USD room service fee will apply for each order placed by stateroom phone. Limitations, restrictions and conditions apply.

^^ Full-suite guests enjoy a complimentary mini-bar setup and do not receive the 750ml bottle of wine.

Facilities

  • Bath
  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Dining Area
  • Vanity Area
  • Shower
  • Whirlpool Bath
  • Room Service Available
  • Free Mini Bar
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk
  • Suite Benefits
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Balcony Stateroom
1-4

Front Row Seat for Beautiful Scenery

This impressive stateroom offers the added indulgence of a balcony and gives you more space than a standard stateroom. Enjoy your own private outdoor space with a table, two chairs, and a relaxing view of the inspiring scenery surrounding you, whether a beautiful sunset over the ocean or a new city to explore. It's also perfect to enjoy cocktails before dinner or a leisurely breakfast.

  • Approx. 214 to 222 sq. ft., including balcony
  • Balcony with 2 chairs and table
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator.
  • Flat-panel television
  • Private bathroom with shower
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • 24-hour room service†
  • Spacious closet
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe

?3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.

†Guests may call for room service delivery or order through OceanNow® in the Princess® Cruises app at any time of the day or night. Guests with the latest Princess Plus and Princess Premier packages enjoy OceanNow® and room service delivery with no charge. Otherwise, a one-time access fee of $14.99 USD per person per voyage will apply for OceanNow® delivery and a $5 USD room service fee will apply for each order placed by stateroom phone. Limitations, restrictions and conditions apply.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Vanity Area
  • Shower
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Interior Stateroom
1-4

Our Most Affordable Option

These staterooms are the perfect place to recharge your batteries. Our most affordable option, featuring two twin beds or a queen-size bed. Other amenities include a refrigerator, hair dryer, TV, closet and bathroom with shower.

  • Approx. 158 to 162 sq ft.

  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator.
  • Flat-panel television
  • Private bathroom with shower
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • 24-hour room service†
  • Spacious closet
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe

?3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.

†Guests may call for room service delivery or order through OceanNow® in the Princess® Cruises app at any time of the day or night. Guests with the latest Princess Plus and Princess Premier packages enjoy OceanNow® and room service delivery with no charge. Otherwise, a one-time access fee of $14.99 USD per person per voyage will apply for OceanNow® delivery and a $5 USD room service fee will apply for each order placed by stateroom phone. Limitations, restrictions and conditions apply.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Shower
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Telephone
  • Desk
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Premium Oceanview Stateroom
1-4

A room with an expansive view

This new stateroom design offers a stunning wall of floor-to-ceiling windows. Loads of natural light brings an airy, openness to the space. Whether the relaxed view of the deep blue sea, or inspired scenery of a new city on the horizon, the Deluxe Oceanview ensures picture-perfect snapshots from the comfort of your room. This stateroom includes all the amenities of an interior room.

  • Approx. 172 sq. ft.
  • Stunning slanted floor-to-ceiling windows
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator
  • Flat-panel television
  • Private bathroom with shower
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • 24-hour room service†
  • Spacious closet
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe

?3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.

†Guests may call for room service delivery or order through OceanNow® in the Princess® Cruises app at any time of the day or night. Guests with the latest Princess Plus and Princess Premier packages enjoy OceanNow® and room service delivery with no charge. Otherwise, a one-time access fee of $14.99 USD per person per voyage will apply for OceanNow® delivery and a $5 USD room service fee will apply for each order placed by stateroom phone. Limitations, restrictions and conditions apply.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Vanity Area
  • Shower
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Sky Suite
1-5

Unparalleled Service & Our Largest Balcony

Exclusive doesn't begin to describe the experience. Inclusive amenities, attentive service and a dedicated Suite Experience Manager to deliver your every desire are just the beginning. Crowning the heights of the ship, each Sky Suite hosts up to five guests, dazzling you with a 270-degree panorama throughout your voyage. Complementing the exquisitely appointed interior living spaces, a luxuriously furnished over 1,000-square-foot continuous balcony – the largest in our fleet – invites you to relax privately or host your own celebrations or catered events.

Includes all the fine amenities of a spacious Reserve Collection Mini-Suite plus:

  • Approx. 1,873 sq. ft., including balcony*
  • Pre-Cruise Shoreside Concierge
  • Seamless curb to suite experience
  • Suite Experience Manager to service your every need
  • Reserved Princess Theater seating
  • Complimentary access to The Enclave
  • Reserved Princess Cays bungalow~
  • Premium Champagne upon arrival
  • Two full bottle bar setup & mixers
  • Complimentary Princess Fine Wine Tasting
  • Private shopping concierge
  • Private Movies Under the Stars balcony viewing
  • Deluxe telescope for Discovery Stargazing at SEA
  • Complimentary Ultimate Balcony Breakfast and Dinner
  • Luxury balcony furniture including dining table for four, large day bed, loungers and exterior bar with mini fridge and TV at private patio
  • Living area with sofa that sleeps one?, side table, lounge chair, coffee table and dining table for four
  • Three floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Master bedroom with Princess Luxury Bed
  • Private master bathroom with bathtub and separate rain shower
  • Spacious closet and vanity/desk in master bedroom
  • Second bedroom with Princess Luxury Bed (queen or two twin beds)?, lounge chair and ottoman
  • Spacious closet and vanity/desk in second bedroom
  • Bathroom with separate shower in second bedroom
  • Full length mirrors
  • Luxury bedroom and bathroom linens
  • Upgraded bathrobes and slippers
  • Luxury bathroom amenities
  • Two refrigerators, one in the living area mini bar and a second on the balcony
  • Four flat-panel televisions
  • Portable hairdryer
  • Nespresso machine

*Port side Sky Suite is 1,808 sq.ft., including balcony

? 3rd/4th/5th berths available

~ Applicable on voyages that visit Princess Cays

Facilities

  • Lounge Area
  • Vanity Area
  • Bath
  • Full Bar
  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Second Bedroom
  • Sofa Bed
  • Dining Area
  • Shower
  • Whirlpool Bath
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • Suite Benefits
  • TV
  • Coffee Machine
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Deluxe Balcony
1-4

Spectacular Views from Your Room

Choose this enhanced version of a Balcony stateroom with more space and a comfortable sofa bed. Enjoy a larger balcony with more room to view the beautiful scenery as you sail from destination to destination and take in the ocean breeze for a wonderful and romantic evening or morning.

  • Approx. 233 to 279 sq. ft., including balcony
  • Balcony with 2 chairs and table
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Sofa bed
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator
  • Flat-panel television
  • Private bathroom with shower
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • 24-hour room service†
  • Spacious closet
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe

?3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.

†Guests may call for room service delivery or order through OceanNow® in the Princess® Cruises app at any time of the day or night. Guests with the latest Princess Plus and Princess Premier packages enjoy OceanNow® and room service delivery with no charge. Otherwise, a one-time access fee of $14.99 USD per person per voyage will apply for OceanNow® delivery and a $5 USD room service fee will apply for each order placed by stateroom phone. Limitations, restrictions and conditions apply.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Vanity Area
  • Shower
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone

View Itinerary By Date



Day 1 Seattle, Washington, United States

Seattle is a scenic seaport city in western Washington, situated on an isthmus between Puget Sound to the west and Lake Washington to the east. It is the largest city in Washington. Five pioneer families from Illinois first settled the area in 1851, and named the town after a friendly Suquamish Indian chief. It was incorporated as a city in 1869, and grew quickly after the Great Northern Railway arrived in 1893, especially during the Alaska Gold Rush of 1897. When the Panama Canal opened in 1914, Seattle became a major Pacific port of entry, and today it is the region's commercial and transportation hub and the centre of manufacturing, trade, and finance, with an estimated 684,451 residents as of 2015.

Day 2  Cruising

Day 3 Ketchikan, Alaska, United States

Ketchikan is famous for its colorful totem poles, rainy skies, steep–as–San Francisco streets, and lush island setting. Some 13,500 people call the town home, and, in the summer, cruise ships crowd the shoreline, floatplanes depart noisily for Misty Fiords National Monument, and salmon-laden commercial fishing boats motor through Tongass Narrows. In the last decade Ketchikan's rowdy, blue-collar heritage of logging and fishing has been softened by the loss of many timber-industry jobs and the dramatic rise of cruise-ship tourism. With some effort, though, visitors can still glimpse the rugged frontier spirit that once permeated this hardscrabble cannery town. Art lovers should make a beeline for Ketchikan: the arts community here is very active. Travelers in search of the perfect piece of Alaska art will find an incredible range of pieces to choose from.The town is at the foot of 3,000-foot Deer Mountain, near the southeastern corner of Revillagigedo (locals shorten it to Revilla) Island. Prior to the arrival of white miners and fishermen in 1885, the Tlingit used the site at the mouth of Ketchikan Creek as a summer fish camp. Gold discoveries just before the turn of the 20th century brought more immigrants, and valuable timber and commercial fishing resources spurred new industries. By the 1930s the town bragged that it was the "salmon-canning capital of the world." You will still find some of Southeast's best salmon fishing around here. Ketchikan is the first bite of Alaska that many travelers taste. Despite its imposing backdrop, hillside homes, and many staircases, the town is relatively easy to walk through. Favorite downtown stops include the Spruce Mill Development shops and Creek Street. A bit farther away you'll find the Totem Heritage Center. Out of town (but included on most bus tours) are two longtime favorites: Totem Bight State Historical Park to the north and Saxman Totem Park to the south.

Day 4 Juneau, Alaska, United States

Juneau, Alaska's capital and third-largest city, is on the North American mainland but can't be reached by road. Bounded by steep mountains and water, the city's geographic isolation and compact size make it much more akin to an island community such as Sitka than to other Alaskan urban centers, such as Fairbanks or Anchorage. Juneau is full of contrasts. Its dramatic hillside location and historic downtown buildings provide a frontier feeling, but the city's cosmopolitan nature comes through in fine museums, noteworthy restaurants, and a literate and outdoorsy populace. The finest of the museums, the Alaska State Museum, is scheduled to reopen in May 2016 on its old site as the expanded Alaska State Library, Archives, and Museum (SLAM) following several years of planning and exhibit research. Another new facility, the Walter Soboleff Center, offers visitors a chance to learn about the indigenous cultures of Southeast Alaska–-Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian. Other highlights include the Mt. Roberts Tramway, plenty of densely forested wilderness areas, quiet bays for sea kayaking, and even a famous drive-up glacier, Mendenhall Glacier. For goings-on, pick up the Juneau Empire (www.juneauempire.com), which keeps tabs on state politics, business, sports, and local news.

Day 5 Hubbard Glacier, United States

This is one of those places that words, photos and videos, do not do justice and just has to be seen to be experienced. Huge, majestic and imposing, the Hubbard Glacier is the iconic Alaskan experience. Towering above the ship, the glacier reaches around 11,000 feet at its highest altitude point and measures almost 76 miles long and about five miles wide. Routinely calving off icebergs the size of skyscrapers , the spectacle of watching – and hearing – the thunderous blocks of ice hit the water is something that needs to be experienced at least once in a lifetime. From pure white, to arctic to glacier blue the ice absorbs every colour giving it an exceptionally lovely hue that is impossible to reproduce. Wrap up warm as the cooling, soothing and perfect breeze compliments what is surely the highlight of this incredible journey.

Day 6 Whittier, United States

The tiny city of Whittier has just over 200 residents. It's around 58 miles southeast of Anchorage in Alaska.

Days 7-16  Cruising

Day 17 Yokohama, Japan

In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.

Day 18 Shimizu, Japan

The salt and pepper cone of Japan's most famous natural landmark won't fail to take your breath away, as it soars into the sky in a vision of spectacular symmetry. Make sure your camera is fully prepared before you dock in Shimizu's port, where unparalleled views of the extraordinary Mount Fuji's dramatic peak await. Take your time to soak up one of Japan's most iconic views, before dipping your toes into the rest of what this destination of tranquil temples has to offer. While there's a bustling fish market, and a charming amusement park waiting close to the port, most new arrivals immediately set off in pursuit of the best views of Mount Fuji, or to see the stunning panorama on offer from the heights of the Kunozan Toshogu Shrine. Take the cable car up to the top, to experience the tranquillity around the forested shrine, and to enjoy its stunning architecture of deep scarlets and gleaming golds. You can also enjoy heart-stopping views out over the Bay of Suruga, and the tea plantations below.

Day 19 Osaka, Japan

From Minami's neon-lighted Dotombori and historic Tenno-ji to the high-rise class and underground shopping labyrinths of Kita, Osaka is a city that pulses with its own unique rhythm. Though Osaka has no shortage of tourist sites, it is the city itself that is the greatest attraction. Home to some of Japan's best food, most unique fashions, and warmest locals, Osaka does not beg to be explored—it demands it. More than anywhere else in Japan, it rewards the impulsive turn down an interesting side street or the chat with a random stranger. People do not come here to see the city, they come to experience it.Excluded from the formal circles of power and aristocratic culture in 16th-century Edo (Tokyo), Osaka took advantage of its position as Japan's trading center, developing its own art forms such as Bunraku puppet theater and Rakugo comic storytelling. It was in Osaka that feudal Japan's famed Floating World—the dining, theater, and pleasure district—was at its strongest and most inventive. Wealthy merchants and common laborers alike squandered fortunes on culinary delights, turning Osaka into "Japan's Kitchen," a moniker the city still has today. Though the city suffered a blow when the Meiji government canceled all of the samurai class's outstanding debts to the merchants, it was quick to recover. At the turn of the 20th century, it had become Japan's largest and most prosperous city, a center of commerce and manufacturing.Today Osaka remains Japan's iconoclastic metropolis, refusing to fit Tokyo's norms and expectations. Unlike the hordes of Tokyo, Osakans are fiercely independent. As a contrast to the neon and concrete surroundings, the people of Osaka are known as Japan's friendliest and most outgoing. Ask someone on the street for directions in Tokyo and you are lucky to get so much as a glance. Ask someone in Osaka and you get a conversation.The main areas of the city, Kita (north) and Minami (south), are divided by two rivers: the Dojima-gawa and the Tosabori-gawa. Between Kita and Minami is Naka-no-shima, an island and the municipal center of Osaka. Kita (north of Chuo Dori) is Osaka's economic hub and contains Osaka's largest stations: JR Osaka and Hankyu Umeda. The area is crammed with shops, department stores, and restaurants. Nearby are a nightlife district, Kita-shinchi; Naka-no-shima and the Museum of Oriental Ceramics; Osaka-jo (Osaka Castle); and Osaka Koen (Osaka Park). Restaurants, bars, department stores, and boutiques attract Osaka's youth to Minami (south Chuo Dori); theatergoers head to the National Bunraku Theatre and electronics-lovers to Den Den Town. For a glimpse of old Osaka, visit Tenno-ji Temple and Shin Sekai. The main stations are Namba, Shin-sai-bashi, Namba Nankai, and Tenno-ji. There's easy access to the Municipal Museum of Fine Art and Sumiyoshi Taisha (Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine).The bay area, to the west of the city center, is home to the Osaka Aquarium and Universal Studios Japan. The Shinkansen stops at Shin-Osaka, three stops (about five minutes) north of Osaka Station on the Mido-suji subway line. To the north of Shin-Osaka is Senri Expo Park.

Day 20 Kochi, Japan

Day 21 Kagoshima, Japan

Kagoshima city is the capital of Kagoshima prefecture and also Kyushu's southernmost major city. This city is often compared to its Italian sister city Naples, due to its's similarities such as mild climate and active volcano, Sakurajima. Sakurajima is one of the most renowned active volcanos not only in Japan but also in the whole entire world. This smoking Sakurajima is centred in Kinko Bay and is one of the main symbols of this prefecture. We cannot talk about Sakurajima without the history of continuous eruption. Sakurajima used to be an isolated island; however, the land has banded together with Osumi peninsula from the eruption in 1914. You may have a chance to see the smoke coming from the top of Sakurajima depending on the weather condition. Not only does the scenery of Sakurajima represent the beauty of Kagoshima City but Senganen garden is also symbolic to elegance in the Kagoshima region. This Japanese garden was constructed by a feudal lord, Mitsuhisa Shimazu, as a guest house of the Kagoshima castle which attracts many visitors for its splendid view.

Day 22  Cruising

Day 23 Keelung (Chilung), Taiwan

With the glittering lights of Taipei - a futuristic metropolis of culture and ideas - sparkling nearby, Keelung is the first calling point for many visitors arriving in Taiwan. While this port city essentially serves as Taipei's ocean gateway, you shouldn't be too hasty in dashing off to Taipei's neon-lit magic – first it's well worth spending some time exploring the famous glowing night market, which hums with life each evening and is famous for its local seafood.

Day 24  Cruising

Day 25 Hong Kong, Hong Kong

The Hong Kong Island skyline, with its ever-growing number of skyscrapers, speaks to ambition and money. Paris, London, even New York were centuries in the making, while Hong Kong's towers, bright lights, and glitzy shopping emporia weren't yet part of the urban scene when many of the young investment bankers who fuel one of the world's leading financial centers were born. Commerce is concentrated in the glittering high-rises of Central, tucked between Victoria Harbor and forested peaks on Hong Kong Island's north shore. While it's easy to think all the bright lights are the sum of today's Hong Kong, you need only walk or board a tram for the short jaunt west into Western to discover a side of Hong Kong that is more traditionally Chinese but no less high-energy. You'll discover the real Hong Kong to the east of Central, too, in Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and beyond. Amid the residential towers are restaurants, shopping malls, bars, convention centers, a nice smattering of museums, and—depending on fate and the horse you wager on—one of Hong Kong's luckiest or unluckiest spots, the Happy Valley Racecourse. Kowloon sprawls across a generous swath of the Chinese mainland across Victoria Harbour from Central. Tsim Sha Tsui, at the tip of Kowloon peninsula, is packed with glitzy shops, first-rate museums, and eye-popping views of the skyline across the water. Just to the north are the teeming market streets of Mong Kok and in the dense residential neighborhoods beyond, two of Hong Kong's most enchanting spiritual sights, Wong Tai Sin Temple and Chi Lin Nunnery. As you navigate this huge metropolis (easy to do on the excellent transportation network), keep in mind that streets are usually numbered odd on one side, even on the other. There's no baseline for street numbers and no block-based numbering system, but street signs indicate building numbers for any given block.

Day 26 Hong Kong, Hong Kong

The Hong Kong Island skyline, with its ever-growing number of skyscrapers, speaks to ambition and money. Paris, London, even New York were centuries in the making, while Hong Kong's towers, bright lights, and glitzy shopping emporia weren't yet part of the urban scene when many of the young investment bankers who fuel one of the world's leading financial centers were born. Commerce is concentrated in the glittering high-rises of Central, tucked between Victoria Harbor and forested peaks on Hong Kong Island's north shore. While it's easy to think all the bright lights are the sum of today's Hong Kong, you need only walk or board a tram for the short jaunt west into Western to discover a side of Hong Kong that is more traditionally Chinese but no less high-energy. You'll discover the real Hong Kong to the east of Central, too, in Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and beyond. Amid the residential towers are restaurants, shopping malls, bars, convention centers, a nice smattering of museums, and—depending on fate and the horse you wager on—one of Hong Kong's luckiest or unluckiest spots, the Happy Valley Racecourse. Kowloon sprawls across a generous swath of the Chinese mainland across Victoria Harbour from Central. Tsim Sha Tsui, at the tip of Kowloon peninsula, is packed with glitzy shops, first-rate museums, and eye-popping views of the skyline across the water. Just to the north are the teeming market streets of Mong Kok and in the dense residential neighborhoods beyond, two of Hong Kong's most enchanting spiritual sights, Wong Tai Sin Temple and Chi Lin Nunnery. As you navigate this huge metropolis (easy to do on the excellent transportation network), keep in mind that streets are usually numbered odd on one side, even on the other. There's no baseline for street numbers and no block-based numbering system, but street signs indicate building numbers for any given block.

Day 27  Cruising

Day 28 Nha Trang, Vietnam

Day 29 Phu My, Vietnam

Day 30  Cruising

Day 31 Singapore, Singapore

The main island of Singapore is shaped like a flattened diamond, 42 km (26 miles) east to west and 23 km (14 miles) north to south. Near the northern peak is the causeway leading to West Malaysia—Kuala Lumpur is less than four hours away by car. It is at the southern foot where you will find most of the city-state's action, with its gleaming office towers, working docks, and futuristic "supertrees," which are solar-powered and serve as vertical gardens. Offshore are Sentosa and over 60 smaller islands, most uninhabited, that serve as bases for oil refining or as playgrounds and beach escapes from the city. To the east is Changi International Airport, connected to the city by metro, bus, and a tree-lined parkway. Of the island's total land area, more than half is built up, with the balance made up of parkland, farmland, plantations, swamp areas, and rain forest. Well-paved roads connect all parts of the island, and Singapore city has an excellent, and constantly expanding, public transportation system. The heart of Singapore's history and its modern wealth are in and around the Central Business District. The area includes the skyscrapers in the Central Business District, the 19th-century Raffles Hotel, the convention centers of Marina Square, on up to the top of Ft. Canning. Although most of old Singapore has been knocked down to make way for the modern city, most colonial landmarks have been preserved in the CBD, including early-19th-century buildings designed by the Irish architect George Coleman.

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The Department of Foreign Affairs has up-to-date advice for Irish citizens on staying safe and healthy abroad. For more security, local laws, health, passport and visa information see https://www.dfa.ie/travel/travel-advice/ and follow dfatravelwise