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British Isles Grand Adventure/Regal Princess
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Regal Princess

British Isles Grand Adventure - 28 night cruise



Cruise only from €2,408

Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Description

Gratuities

Dates and Prices

Cabins

Explore and revel in the latest offerings at sea

Enjoy sweeping views from one of more than 1,400 balconies on Regal Princess or stroll on the SeaWalk®, a glass-floor walkway extending 28 feet beyond the edge of the ship! From the tranquil Sanctuary, a retreat reserved for adults, to the dazzling Princess WaterColour Fantasy light and water show and more, you'll find diversions for every mood.

Cruise ID: 12238

To simplify the tipping process for our passengers, a discretionary gratuity charge will be automatically added to your shipboard account on a daily basis. The daily gratuity amounts are $16.50 per guest for suites, $15.50 per guest for mini-suites and club class, and $14.50 per guest for interior, oceanview, and balcony staterooms. This gratuity will be shared amongst those staff who have helped provide and support your cruise experience, including all waitstaff, stateroom stewards, buffet stewards, and housekeeping staff across the fleet. A 18% gratuity is added to bar charges and dining room wine accounts. 

Date Time Price * Booking
05 April 2024 15:00 €2,408 Call us to book

* Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.

Cabins on Regal Princess

Deluxe Balcony
1-4

Spectacular Views from Your Room

Choose this enhanced version of a Balcony stateroom with more space and a comfortable sofa bed. Enjoy a larger balcony with more room to view the beautiful scenery as you sail from destination to destination and take in the ocean breeze for a wonderful and romantic evening or morning. This stateroom also includes some of the amenities offered in a Mini-Suite stateroom.

  • Approx. 233 to 279 sq. ft., including balcony
  • Balcony with 2 chairs and table
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Sofa bed
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator
  • Flat-panel television
  • Private bathroom with shower
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • Complimentary 24-hour room service†
  • Spacious closet
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe
?3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.
†Charges apply for balcony dinner, pizza delivery and beverages. Subject to change.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Shower
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Balcony
1-4

Front Row Seat for Beautiful Scenery

This impressive stateroom offers the added indulgence of a balcony and gives you more space than a standard stateroom. Enjoy your own private outdoor space with a table, two chairs, and a relaxing view of the inspiring scenery surrounding you, whether a beautiful sunset over the ocean or a new city to explore. It's also perfect to enjoy cocktails before dinner or a leisurely breakfast.

  • Approx. 214 to 222 sq. ft., including balcony
  • Balcony with 2 chairs and table
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator.
  • Flat-panel television
  • Private bathroom with shower
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • Complimentary 24-hour room service†
  • Spacious closet
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe
?3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.
†Charges apply for balcony dinner, pizza delivery and beverages. Subject to change.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Shower
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Mini-Suite
1-4

Add an Element of Luxury to Your Stay

Choose a luxurious Mini-Suite with balcony which is substantially larger than a Balcony stateroom and receive a complimentary welcome glass of bubbly. Mini-Suites include a separate sitting area with sofa bed and two flat-panel televisions. For families or groups needing a little extra space, Mini-Suites offer an appealing and affordable option.

  • Approximately 323 sq. ft., including balcony
  • Balcony with 2-4 chairs, table and ottoman
  • Bathroom tub and massage shower head
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Separate sitting area with sofa bed & coffee table
  • Complimentary welcome glass of bubbly on embarkation day
  • Luxury mattress topper and pillows
  • Two flat-panel televisions
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • Complimentary 24-hour room service†
  • Spacious closet
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe
?3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.
†Charges apply for balcony dinner, pizza delivery and beverages. Subject to change.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Suite
1-4

Most Luxurious Accommodations at Sea

Surrounding you with deluxe accommodations, a spacious Suite with balcony includes all the amenities of a Club Class Mini-Suite, plus incredible premiums. Enjoy more living space, a sofa bed and separate seating areas, and wonderfully enhanced amenities that range from priority embarkation and disembarkation to a complimentary mini-bar setup in suite and so much more.

Includes all the fine amenities of a spacious Club Class Mini-Suite plus:

  • Approx. 440 to 1,500 sq. ft., including balcony
  • Luxury balcony furniture including 2 loungers, 4 chairs, table and ottoman
  • 2 floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Separate sitting area with sofa bed, chair and 2 tables
  • One complimentary mini-bar setup and free daily bottled water
  • Spacious closet
  • Complimentary laundry and professional cleaning services
  • Complimentary Speciality Dining Dinner on embarkation evening^
  • Priority speciality dining and shore excursion reservation
  • Priority disembarkation at tender ports
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator
  • Two flat-panel televisions
  • Private bathroom with tub and separate shower
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • Complimentary 24-hour room service†
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & fine bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe
? 3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.
† Charges apply for balcony dinner, pizza delivery and beverages. Subject to change.
^ Applicable on cruises six days or longer. Reservations can be made once onboard your ship.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Room Service Available
  • Free Mini Bar
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Club Class Mini-Suite
1-4

Mini-Suite with Exclusive VIP Touches

A premium stateroom category featuring our best located Mini-Suite staterooms, as well as the great amenities found in all Mini-Suites — plus premier dining benefits and luxurious perks. Each night, enjoy Club Class Dining, an exclusive dining area featuring expedited seating with no wait, additional menu options, dedicated wait staff and tableside preparations. Other amenities include priority embarkation and disembarkation, a complimentary one-time wine set-up and so much more!^

^Includes ½ bottle of red wine and ½ bottle of white wine on embarkation day.

Standard Amenities:

  • Approximately 323 sq. ft., including balcony
  • Balcony with 2-4 chairs, table and ottoman
  • Bathroom tub and massage shower head with upgraded amenities
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Separate sitting area with sofa bed & coffee table
  • Complimentary welcome glass of bubbly on embarkation day
  • Luxury mattress topper and pillows
  • Two flat-panel televisions
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • Complimentary 24-hour room service†
  • Spacious closet
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & fine bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe
Upgraded Amenities & Services:
  • The Princess Luxury Bed
  • Priority embarkation and disembarkation at the beginning and end of your cruise
  • One-time complimentary wine set-up^
  • Evening canapés, upon request
  • Luxurious terry shawl bathrobes
Club Class Dining:*
  • Exclusive area of the Main Dining Room
  • Expedited seating with minimal to no wait
  • Additional menu options
  • Dedicated waitstaff
  • Uniquely-styled décor (Premium table linens only)
  • Table-side preparations
?3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.
†Charges apply for balcony dinner, pizza delivery and beverages. Subject to change.
^Includes ½ bottle of red wine and ½ bottle of white wine on embarkation day.
*Open every evening for dinner. Open for breakfast and lunch on sea days.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

Interior
1-4

Our Most Affordable Option

These staterooms are the perfect place to recharge your batteries. Our most affordable option, featuring two twin beds or a queen-size bed. Other amenities include a refrigerator, hair dryer, TV, closet and bathroom with shower.

  • Approx. 158 to 162 sq ft.
  • Comfortable queen or two twin beds?
  • Refrigerator.
  • Flat-panel television
  • Private bathroom with shower
  • 100% cotton, high-thread count linens
  • Complimentary 24-hour room service†
  • Spacious closet
  • Desk with chair
  • Hair dryer & bathroom amenities
  • Digital security safe
?3rd/4th berths available in select cabins.
†Charges apply for balcony dinner, pizza delivery and beverages. Subject to change.

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Shower
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Desk
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)

View Itinerary By Date



Day 1 Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States

Like many southeast Florida neighbors, Fort Lauderdale has long been revitalizing. In a state where gaudy tourist zones often stand aloof from workaday downtowns, Fort Lauderdale exhibits consistency at both ends of the 2-mile Las Olas corridor. The sparkling look results from upgrades both downtown and on the beachfront. Matching the downtown's innovative arts district, cafés, and boutiques is an equally inventive beach area, with hotels, cafés, and shops facing an undeveloped shoreline, and new resort-style hotels replacing faded icons of yesteryear. Despite wariness of pretentious overdevelopment, city leaders have allowed a striking number of glittering high-rises. Nostalgic locals and frequent visitors fret over the diminishing vision of sailboats bobbing in waters near downtown; however, Fort Lauderdale remains the yachting capital of the world, and the water toys don't seem to be going anywhere.

Days 2-8  Cruising

Day 9 Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal

Offering solace on the long journey across the Atlantic, Ponta Delgada is the Azores Islands' largest city, and a welcome relief for any weary sailor. Located on an archipelago of Portuguese islands, some 1,100 miles from the mainland, you can explore humbling volcanic scenery, as well as Sao Miguel's verdant landscape - which glows with colour when the hydrangeas that the Azores are known for bloom into life during the summer months. The striking black and white facade of the Church of Sao Jose welcomes you to the city itself, while you can head to the markets to pick up the pineapples, tea leaves and coffee beans that add a little flavour to the island. As the largest city of the Azores, Ponta Delgada is well stocked with places to eat delicious local seafood, or pick up a little shopping, as you enjoy setting your feet on dry land, following a long journey at sea. Volcanic firepower has carved these stunning islands, and a journey up to Caldeira das Sete Cidades is a must do, where you can hike beside the water-filled crater, and admire views of steep green walls, and the uninterrupted Atlantic Ocean stretching beyond them. Lagoa de Fogo offers yet more humbling views, with the crater lake dropping off sharply to rippled ocean far below.

Days 10-11  Cruising

Day 12 Lisbon, Portugal

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Day 13  Cruising

Day 14 Bilbao, Spain

Time in Bilbao (Bilbo, in Euskera) may be recorded as BG or AG (Before Guggenheim or After Guggenheim). Never has a single monument of art and architecture so radically changed a city. Frank Gehry's stunning museum, Norman Foster's sleek subway system, the Santiago Calatrava glass footbridge and airport, the leafy César Pelli Abandoibarra park and commercial complex next to the Guggenheim, and the Philippe Starck AlhóndigaBilbao cultural center have contributed to an unprecedented cultural revolution in what was once the industry capital of the Basque Country.Greater Bilbao contains almost 1 million inhabitants, nearly half the total population of the Basque Country. Founded in 1300 by Vizcayan noble Diego López de Haro, Bilbao became an industrial center in the mid-19th century, largely because of the abundance of minerals in the surrounding hills. An affluent industrial class grew up here, as did the working class in suburbs that line the Margen Izquierda (Left Bank) of the Nervión estuary.Bilbao's new attractions get more press, but the city's old treasures still quietly line the banks of the rust-color Nervión River. The Casco Viejo (Old Quarter)—also known as Siete Calles (Seven Streets)—is a charming jumble of shops, bars, and restaurants on the river's Right Bank, near the Puente del Arenal bridge. This elegant proto-Bilbao nucleus was carefully restored after devastating floods in 1983. Throughout the Casco Viejo are ancient mansions emblazoned with family coats of arms, wooden doors, and fine ironwork balconies. The most interesting square is the 64-arch Plaza Nueva, where an outdoor market is pitched every Sunday morning.Walking the banks of the Nervión is a satisfying jaunt. After all, this was how—while out on a morning jog—Guggenheim director Thomas Krens first discovered the perfect spot for his project, nearly opposite the right bank's Deusto University. From the Palacio de Euskalduna upstream to the colossal Mercado de la Ribera, parks and green zones line the river. César Pelli's Abandoibarra project fills in the half mile between the Guggenheim and the Euskalduna bridge with a series of parks, the Deusto University library, the Meliá Bilbao Hotel, and a major shopping center.On the left bank, the wide, late-19th-century boulevards of the Ensanche neighborhood, such as Gran Vía (the main shopping artery) and Alameda de Mazarredo, are the city's more formal face. Bilbao's cultural institutions include, along with the Guggenheim, a major museum of fine arts (the Museo de Bellas Artes) and an opera society (Asociación Bilbaína de Amigos de la Ópera, or ABAO) with 7,000 members from Spain and southern France. In addition, epicureans have long ranked Bilbao's culinary offerings among the best in Spain. Don't miss a chance to ride the trolley line, the Euskotram, for a trip along the river from Atxuri Station to Basurto's San Mamés soccer stadium, reverently dubbed "la Catedral del Fútbol" (the Cathedral of Football).

Day 15  Cruising

Day 16 Cherbourg, France

Originally a little fishing village, Cherbourg has developed into a historic port designed by Vauban. This was also a strategic naval port during the Napoleonic wars; there is a marina with over 1000 moorings. “Cap de la Hague” is to the West and the “Pointe de Barfleur” to the East. This port, which belongs to Normandy, is a region that has provided inspiration for countless artists and writers, and is the land of apple orchards and rolling farmland dotted with villages of half-timbered houses. Boasting a wealth of abbeys and châteaux, as well as a superb coastline, it offers something for everyone. Cherbourg was also the first stop of RMS Titanic after it left Southampton, England. On 19 June 1864, the naval engagement between USS Kearsarge and CSS Alabama took place off Cherbourg. The Battle of Cherbourg, fought in June 1944 following the Normandy Invasion, ended with the capture of Cherbourg on June 30.

Day 17 Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain's largest cruise port. It has been one of England's major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Day 18 Isle of Portland, England

The Isle of Portland is a tied island, 6 kilometres long by 2.7 kilometres wide, in the English Channel. The southern tip, Portland Bill lies 8 kilometres south of the resort of Weymouth, forming the southernmost point of the county of Dorset, England. A barrier beach called Chesil Beach joins it to the mainland.

Day 19  Cruising

Day 20 Cobh, Ireland

Cork City's nearby harbor district has seen plenty of history. Cork Harbour's draws include Fota Island—with an arboretum, a wildlife park, and the Fota House ancestral estate—and the fishing port of Cobh.

Day 21 Dun Laoghaire, Ireland

Day 22 Greenock, Scotland

Trendy stores, a booming cultural life, fascinating architecture, and stylish restaurants reinforce Glasgow's claim to being Scotland's most exciting city. After decades of decline, it has experienced an urban renaissance uniquely its own. The city's grand architecture reflects a prosperous past built on trade and shipbuilding. Today buildings by Charles Rennie Mackintosh hold pride of place along with the Zaha Hadid–designed Riverside Museum.Glasgow (the "dear green place," as it was known) was founded some 1,500 years ago. Legend has it that the king of Strathclyde, irate about his wife's infidelity, had a ring he had given her thrown into the river Clyde. (Apparently she had passed it on to an admirer.) When the king demanded to know where the ring had gone, the distraught queen asked the advice of her confessor, St. Mungo. He suggested fishing for it—and the first salmon to emerge had the ring in its mouth. The moment is commemorated on the city's coat of arms.The medieval city expanded when it was given a royal license to trade; the current High Street was the main thoroughfare at the time. The vast profits from American cotton and tobacco built the grand mansions of the Merchant City in the 18th century. In the 19th century the river Clyde became the center of a vibrant shipbuilding industry, fed by the city's iron and steel works. The city grew again, but its internal divisions grew at the same time. The West End harbored the elegant homes of the newly rich shipyard owners. Down by the river, areas like the infamous Gorbals, with its crowded slums, sheltered the laborers who built the ships. They came from the Highlands, expelled to make way for sheep, or from Ireland, where the potato famines drove thousands from their homes.During the 19th century the population grew from 80,000 to more than a million. And the new prosperity gave Glasgow its grand neoclassical buildings, such as those built by Alexander "Greek" Thomson, as well as the adventurous visionary buildings designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh and others who produced Glasgow's Arts and Crafts movement. The City Chambers, built in 1888, are a proud statement in marble and gold sandstone, a clear symbol of the wealthy and powerful Victorian industrialists' hopes for the future.The decline of shipbuilding and the closure of the factories led to much speculation as to what direction the city would take now. The curious thing is that, at least in part, the past gave the city a new lease of life. It was as if people looked at their city and saw Glasgow's beauty for the first time: its extraordinarily rich architectural heritage, its leafy parks, its artistic heritage, and its complex social history. Today Glasgow is a vibrant cultural center and a commercial hub, as well as a launching pad from which to explore the rest of Scotland, which, as it turns out, is not so far away. In fact, it takes only 40 minutes to reach Loch Lomond, where the other Scotland begins.

Day 23  Cruising

Day 24 Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland

In bustling Kirkwall, the main town on Orkney, there's plenty to see in the narrow, winding streets extending from the harbor. The cathedral and some museums are highlights.

Day 25 Invergordon, Scotland

The port of Invergordon is your gateway to the Great Glen, an area of Scotland that includes Loch Ness and the city of Inverness. Inverness, the capital of the Highlands, has the flavor of a Lowland town, its winds blowing in a sea-salt air from the Moray Firth. The Great Glen is also home to one of the world's most famous monster myths: in 1933, during a quiet news week, the editor of a local paper decided to run a story about a strange sighting of something splashing about in Loch Ness. But there's more to look for here besides Nessie, including inland lochs, craggy and steep-sided mountains, rugged promontories, deep inlets, brilliant purple and emerald moorland, and forests filled with astonishingly varied wildlife, including mountain hares, red deer, golden eagles, and ospreys.

Day 26 Queensferry, Scotland

Day 27  Cruising

Day 28 Le Havre, France

Le Havre, founded by King Francis I of France in 1517, is located inUpper Normandy on the north bank of the mouth of the River Seine, which isconsidered the most frequented waterway in the world. Its port is ranked thesecond largest in France. The city was originally built on marshland andmudflats that were drained in the 1500's. During WWII most of Le Havre wasdestroyed by Allied bombing raids. Post war rebuilding of the city followed thedevelopment plans of the well-known Belgian architect Auguste Perre. Thereconstruction was so unique that the entire city was listed as a UNESCO WorldHeritage Site in 2005. 

Day 29 Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain's largest cruise port. It has been one of England's major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

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