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Western Mediterranean Cruise/Voyager of the Seas
Cruise holidays   >   Mediterranean and Europe   >   Western Mediterranean Cruise

Voyager of the Seas

Western Mediterranean Cruise - 10 night cruise



Cruise only from €2,307

Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Description

Gratuities

Dates and Prices

Cabins

The amped up Voyager of the Seas® is packed with more ways to play.

Take on three stories of twisting, turning adventure on two high-speed waterslides in The Perfect Storm℠ or go head to head in a glow-in-the-dark laser tag clash in Battle for Planet Z℠. Hang ten on the FlowRider℠* surf simulator or recharge and reinvigorate at the spa and adults-only solarium. Plus enjoy Voyager Dunes, ice-skating, rock-climbing wall and totally reimagined spaces for every kid and teen. 

Cruise ID: 33175

As of November 11, 2023*, the automatic service gratuity of $18.00 USD per person, per day for guests in non-suites staterooms and Junior Suite, or $20.50 USD per person, per day for guests in Suites, will be applied to each guest's SeaPass account on a daily basis. The gratuity applies to individual guests of all ages and stateroom categories. As a way to reward our crew members for their outstanding service, gratuities are shared among dining, bar & culinary services staff, stateroom attendants and other hotel services teams who work behind the scenes to enhance the cruise experience.

In the unlikely event that a guest onboard being charged the daily automatic gratuity does not receive satisfactory service, the guest may request to modify the daily amount at their discretion by visiting Guest Services onboard and will be able to do so until the morning of their departure. Guests who have pre-paid their gratuity will not see a daily charge during their cruise.

The automatic daily gratuity is based on customary industry standards. Applying this charge automatically helps streamline the recognition process for the crew members who work to enhance your cruise. We hope you find the gratuity to be an accurate reflection of your satisfaction and thank you for your generous recognition of our staff.

A 18% gratuity is automatically added to all beverages and mini bar items.

A 20% gratuity is automatically added to all spa & salon purchases.

Guests can pre-pay gratuities by calling (UK) 0344 493 4005 / (Ireland) 1800 555 604 or logging into www.royalcaribbean.co.uk before* their sailing. For guests booked through travel advisors, their advisor may add pre-paid gratuities to the guests' booking prior to sailing*. If gratuities are not prepaid prior to sailing, they will be automatically added to the guests' folios once onboard.

Guests who choose ‘My Time Dining' on all European sailings will have gratuities automatically added to their bill, as they may be served by different members of the team each night. This means tips for your waiting staff – as well as other dining and housekeeping staff – will be included in the quoted price for ‘My Time Dining' on your cruise holiday

Guests who choose our open dining option may opt-in to pre-paid gratuities for dining, or add them to their account at check-out.

*Pre-paid gratuities can be added to an individual reservation at any time outside of 48 hours of the sail date.

Date Time Price * Booking
16 May 2025 17:00 €2,307 Call us to book

* Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.

Cabins on Voyager of the Seas

Interior
1-4

Enjoy your holiday in the perfect space.

Size

  • Stateroom: 160 sq. ft. or 14.86 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • Two Pullman beds in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • n/a

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Spacious Panoramic Ocean View
1-4

Marvel the view through a floor-to-ceiling panoramic window.

Size

  • Stateroom: 191 sq. ft. or 17.74 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Junior Suite Guarantee
3-4

These suites offer a comfortable bedroom, a small sitting area and a private balcony.

Size

  • Stateroom: 277 sq. ft. or 25.73 sq. m.
  • Balcony: 50 sq. ft. or 4.65 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • Ocean view
Some staterooms have an obstructed view

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom with tub

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Promenade View Interior
1-2

Delight in bowed windows overlooking the Royal Promenade.

Size

  • Stateroom: 167 sq. ft. or 15.51 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed

Occupancy

  • Up to 2 guests

Views

  • Royal Promenade View

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Ocean View Stateroom Guarantee
3-4

Our Ocean View staterooms offer a gorgeous view, two twin beds and a private bathroom

Size

  • Stateroom: 160 sq. ft. or 14.86 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • Two Pullman beds in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Pullman Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Junior Suite
1-4

An incredible intimate suite with a great view.

Size

  • Stateroom: 277 sq. ft. or 25.73 sq. m.
  • Balcony: 50 sq. ft. or 4.65 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • Ocean view
Some staterooms have an obstructed view

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom with tub

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Ocean View
1-4

Gaze at the beautiful views from your cosy room.

Size

  • Stateroom: 160 sq. ft. or 14.86 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • Two Pullman beds in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Pullman Bed x2
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Interior Stateroom Guarantee
2-4

This standard stateroom offers two twin beds, a private bathroom and all the facilities of our standard staterooms.

Size

  • Stateroom: 160 sq. ft. or 14.86 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • Two Pullman beds in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • n/a

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Pullman Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Interior with Virtual Balcony
1-2

Enjoy a live feed scenic view in the comfort of your room.

Size

  • Stateroom: 160 sq. ft. or 14.86 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King

Occupancy

  • Up to 2 guests

Views

  • Real-time ocean views and destinations via a high-definition screen

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Connecting Ocean View Balcony
1-2

Experience a spectacular view for a memorable holiday.

Size

  • Stateroom: 198 sq. ft. or 18.39 sq. m.
  • Balcony: 46 sq. ft. or 4.27 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed

Occupancy

  • Up to 2 guests

Views

  • Ocean View

Rooms

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Spacious Ocean View Balcony
1-4

Immerse yourself in a gorgeous view for a memorable holiday.

Size

  • Stateroom: 203 sq. ft. or 18.86 sq. m.
  • Balcony: 42 sq. ft. or 3.9 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Ultra Spacious Ocean View
1-6

Have a spectacular view in an immense space with family.

Size

  • Stateroom: 328 sq. ft. or 30.47 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed
  • Two Pullman beds

Occupancy

  • Up to 6 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Pullman Bed x2
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Ocean View Balcony
1-3

Experience a spectacular view for a memorable holiday.

Size

  • Stateroom: 198 sq. ft. or 18.39 sq. m.
  • Balcony: 42 sq. ft. or 3.9 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One Pullman bed in staterooms with up to three guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 3 guests

Views

  • Ocean view
  • Some staterooms have an obstructed view

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Pullman Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Connecting Promenade Interior
1-2

Delight in bowed windows overlooking the Royal Promenade.

Size

  • Stateroom: 160 sq. ft. or 14.86 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed

Occupancy

  • Up to 2 guests

Views

  • Royal Promenade View

Rooms

  • Room with bed, vanity and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Ocean View Stateroom with Balcony Guarantee
2-4

Experience a spectacular view for a memorable holiday.

Size

  • Stateroom: 198 sq. ft. or 18.39 sq. m.
  • Balcony: 42 sq. ft. or 3.9 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One Pullman bed in staterooms with up to three guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 3 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Some staterooms have an obstructed view

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk
  • Pullman Bed

Grand Suite - 2 bedroom
1-8

Indulge in a comfortable suite and enjoy the extra perks.

Size

  • Stateroom: 547 sq. ft. or 50.82 sq. m.
  • Balcony: 234 sq. ft. or 21.74 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two bedrooms with two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed.
  • One double sofa bed
  • Two Pullman beds

Occupancy

  • Up to 8 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Living Spaces

  • Two bedrooms
  • Living area
  • Private balcony with an outdoor dining and seating area

Bathrooms

  • Two bathrooms (master bathroom with tub)

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Pullman Bed x2
  • Lounge Area
  • Dining Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • Suite Benefits
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Royal Suite - 1 bedroom
1-4

Relish an extraordinary holiday in this luxurious suite.

Size

  • Stateroom: 1,260 sq. ft. or 117.06 sq. m.
  • Balcony: 196 sq. ft. or 18.21 sq. m.

Beds

  • One King bed
  • One double sofa bed

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Rooms

  • Bedroom
  • Private balcony with outdoor dining, seating area and whirlpool

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom with tub, two dressers and a bidet

Exclusive for Suites

  • Priority check-in and departure lounge
  • Concierge Club service on select ships
  • VIP seating at the pool deck and theatre
  • Priority tender tickets
  • Private seating for breakfast and lunch in speciality restaurants
  • Complimentary luggage valet service
  • Luxury spa bathrobes
  • Complimentary ironing service on formal night

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Dining Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Whirlpool Bath
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • Suite Benefits
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Owner's Suite - 1 bedroom
1-4

Enjoy the ultimate suite for a perfect holiday.

Size

  • Stateroom: 506 sq. ft. or 47.01 sq. m.
  • Balcony: 90 sq. ft. or 8.36 sq. m.

Beds

  • One Queen-size bed
  • One double sofa bed

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Rooms

  • Room with bed and dresser
  • Living area with double sofa bed

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom with tub

Exclusive for Suites

  • Priority check-in and departure lounge
  • Concierge Club service on select ships
  • VIP seating at the pool deck and theatre
  • Priority tender tickets
  • Private seating for breakfast and lunch in speciality restaurants
  • Complimentary luggage valet service
  • Luxury spa bathrobes
  • Complimentary ironing service on formal night

Facilities

  • Queen or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • Suite Benefits
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Grand Suite - 1 bedroom
1-4

Enjoy a comfortable suite and the extra perks.

Size

  • Stateroom: 381 sq. ft. or 35.4 sq. m.
  • Balcony: 95 sq. ft. or 8.83 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom with tub

Exclusive for Suites

  • Priority check-in and departure lounge
  • Concierge Club service on select ships
  • VIP seating at the pool deck and theatre
  • Priority tender tickets
  • Private seating for breakfast and lunch in speciality restaurants
  • Complimentary luggage valet service
  • Luxury spa bathrobes
  • Complimentary ironing service on formal night

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Bath
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • Suite Benefits
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Spacious Ocean View
1-4

Have a spectacular view for a memorable holiday.

Size

  • Stateroom: 211 sq. ft. or 19.6 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Occupancy

  • Up to 4 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Living Spaces

  • Room with bed, dresser and sitting area with sofa

Bathrooms

  • One bathroom

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

Ocean View Panoramic Suite (No Balcony)
1-6

Enjoy the view through a wrap-around panoramic window with your family.

Size

  • Stateroom: 406 sq. ft. or 37.72 sq. m.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed
  • Two Pullman beds

Occupancy

  • Up to 6 guests

Views

  • Ocean view

Living Spaces

  • Bedroom area with double bed
  • Living area with double sofa bed, dresser and sitting area.
  • Curtained section with bunk beds

Bathrooms

  • One and a half bathrooms

Suite Facilities

  • Dedicated check-in queues
  • Reserved VIP seating
  • Priority Departure
  • Dedicated Suite Attendant
  • Luxury spa bathrobes to use onboard

Facilities

  • King or Twin Configuration
  • Sofa Bed
  • Pullman Bed x2
  • Lounge Area
  • Shower
  • Toiletries Provided
  • Room Service Available
  • Suite Benefits
  • TV
  • Wi-Fi (Additional Cost)
  • Safe
  • Hair Dryer
  • Telephone
  • Desk

View Itinerary By Date



Day 1 Barcelona, Spain

The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.

Day 2 Ajaccio, Corsica, France

Considered Corsica's primary commercial and cultural hub, the largest city and regional capital of Ajaccio is situated on the west coast of the island, approximately 644 km (400 miles) southeast of Marseille, France. Founded in 1492, vestiges of ancient Corsica in this ville impériale revolve around the city's most famous son, Napoléon Bonaparte, whose family home—now the national museum Maison Bonaparte—pays tribute to the emperor's historical influence.Remnants from what was originally a 12th-century Genoese colony are still visible around the Old Town near the imposing citadel and watchtower. Perfect for exploring, the luminous seaside city surrounded by snowcapped mountains and pretty beaches offers numerous sites, eateries, side streets, and a popular harbor, where sailboats and fishing vessels moor in the picturesque Tino Rossi port lined with well-established restaurants and cafés serving fresh local fare.

Day 3 Cagliari, Italy

Known in Sardinia as Casteddu, the island's capital has steep streets and impressive Italianate architecture, from modern to medieval. This city of nearly 160,000 people is characterized by a busy commercial center and waterfront with broad avenues and arched arcades, as well as by the typically narrow streets of the old hilltop citadel (called, simply, “Castello”). The Museo Archeologico makes a good starting point to a visit. The imposing Bastione di Saint Remy and Mercato di San Benedetto (one of the best fish markets in Italy) are both musts.

Day 4 Palermo, Italy

Once the intellectual capital of southern Europe, Palermo has always been at the crossroads of civilization. Favorably situated on a crescent-shaped bay at the foot of Monte Pellegrino, it has attracted almost every culture touching the Mediterranean world. To Palermo's credit, it has absorbed these diverse cultures into a unique personality that is at once Arab and Christian, Byzantine and Roman, Norman and Italian. The city's heritage encompasses all of Sicily's varied ages, but its distinctive aspect is its Arab-Norman identity, an improbable marriage that, mixed in with Byzantine and Jewish elements, created some resplendent works of art. No less noteworthy than the architecture is Palermo's chaotic vitality, on display at some of Italy's most vibrant outdoor markets, public squares, street bazaars, and food vendors, and above all in its grand climax of Italy's most spectacular passeggiata (the leisurely social stroll along the principal thoroughfare).

Day 5  Cruising

Day 6 Santorini, Greece

Undoubtedly the most extraordinary island in the Aegean, crescent-shape Santorini remains a mandatory stop on the Cycladic tourist route—even if it's necessary to enjoy the sensational sunsets from Ia, the fascinating excavations, and the dazzling white towns with a million other travelers. Called Kállisti (the "Loveliest") when first settled, the island has now reverted to its subsequent name of Thira, after the 9th-century-BC Dorian colonizer Thiras. The place is better known, however, these days as Santorini, a name derived from its patroness, St. Irene of Thessaloniki, the Byzantine empress who restored icons to Orthodoxy and died in 802. You can fly conveniently to Santorini, but to enjoy a true Santorini rite of passage, opt instead for the boat trip here, which provides a spectacular introduction. After the boat sails between Sikinos and Ios, your deck-side perch approaches two close islands with a passage between them. The bigger one on the left is Santorini, and the smaller on the right is Thirassia. Passing between them, you see the village of Ia adorning Santorini's northernmost cliff like a white geometric beehive. You are in the caldera (volcanic crater), one of the world's truly breathtaking sights: a demilune of cliffs rising 1,100 feet, with the white clusters of the towns of Fira and Ia perched along the top. The bay, once the high center of the island, is 1,300 feet in some places, so deep that when boats dock in Santorini's shabby little port of Athinios, they do not drop anchor. The encircling cliffs are the ancient rim of a still-active volcano, and you are sailing east across its flooded caldera. On your right are the Burnt isles, the White isle, and other volcanic remnants, all lined up as if some outsize display in a geology museum. Hephaestus's subterranean fires smolder still—the volcano erupted in 198 BC, about 735, and there was an earthquake in 1956. Indeed, Santorini and its four neighboring islets are the fragmentary remains of a larger landmass that exploded about 1600 BC: the volcano's core blew sky high, and the sea rushed into the abyss to create the great bay, which measures 10 km by 7 km (6 mi by 4½ mi) and is 1,292 feet deep. The other pieces of the rim, which broke off in later eruptions, are Thirassia, where a few hundred people live, and deserted little Aspronissi ("White isle"). In the center of the bay, black and uninhabited, two cones, the Burnt Isles of Palea Kameni and Nea Kameni, appeared between 1573 and 1925. There has been too much speculation about the identification of Santorini with the mythical Atlantis, mentioned in Egyptian papyri and by Plato (who says it's in the Atlantic), but myths are hard to pin down. This is not true of old arguments about whether tidal waves from Santorini's cataclysmic explosion destroyed Minoan civilization on Crete, 113 km (70 mi) away. The latest carbon-dating evidence, which points to a few years before 1600 BC for the eruption, clearly indicates that the Minoans outlasted the eruption by a couple of hundred years, but most probably in a weakened state. In fact, the island still endures hardships: since antiquity, Santorini has depended on rain collected in cisterns for drinking and irrigating—the well water is often brackish—and the serious shortage is alleviated by the importation of water. However, the volcanic soil also yields riches: small, intense tomatoes with tough skins used for tomato paste (good restaurants here serve them); the famous Santorini fava beans, which have a light, fresh taste; barley; wheat; and white-skin eggplants.

Day 7 Piraeus, Greece

It's no wonder that all roads lead to the fascinating and maddening metropolis of Athens. Lift your eyes 200 feet above the city to the Parthenon, its honey-color marble columns rising from a massive limestone base, and you behold architectural perfection that has not been surpassed in 2,500 years. But, today, this shrine of classical form dominates a 21st-century boomtown. To experience Athens—Athína in Greek—fully is to understand the essence of Greece: ancient monuments surviving in a sea of cement, startling beauty amid the squalor, tradition juxtaposed with modernity. Locals depend on humor and flexibility to deal with the chaos; you should do the same. The rewards are immense. Although Athens covers a huge area, the major landmarks of the ancient Greek, Roman, and Byzantine periods are close to the modern city center. You can easily walk from the Acropolis to many other key sites, taking time to browse in shops and relax in cafés and tavernas along the way. From many quarters of the city you can glimpse "the glory that was Greece" in the form of the Acropolis looming above the horizon, but only by actually climbing that rocky precipice can you feel the impact of the ancient settlement. The Acropolis and Filopappou, two craggy hills sitting side by side; the ancient Agora (marketplace); and Kerameikos, the first cemetery, form the core of ancient and Roman Athens. Along the Unification of Archaeological Sites promenade, you can follow stone-paved, tree-lined walkways from site to site, undisturbed by traffic. Cars have also been banned or reduced in other streets in the historical center. In the National Archaeological Museum, vast numbers of artifacts illustrate the many millennia of Greek civilization; smaller museums such as the Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art Museum and the Byzantine and Christian Museum illuminate the history of particular regions or periods. Athens may seem like one huge city, but it is really a conglomeration of neighborhoods with distinctive characters. The Eastern influences that prevailed during the 400-year rule of the Ottoman Empire are still evident in Monastiraki, the bazaar area near the foot of the Acropolis. On the northern slope of the Acropolis, stroll through Plaka (if possible by moonlight), an area of tranquil streets lined with renovated mansions, to get the flavor of the 19th-century's gracious lifestyle. The narrow lanes of Anafiotika, a section of Plaka, thread past tiny churches and small, color-washed houses with wooden upper stories, recalling a Cycladic island village. In this maze of winding streets, vestiges of the older city are everywhere: crumbling stairways lined with festive tavernas; dank cellars filled with wine vats; occasionally a court or diminutive garden, enclosed within high walls and filled with magnolia trees and the flaming trumpet-shaped flowers of hibiscus bushes. Formerly run-down old quarters, such as Thission, Gazi and Psirri, popular nightlife areas filled with bars and mezedopoleia (similar to tapas bars), are now in the process of gentrification, although they still retain much of their original charm, as does the colorful produce and meat market on Athinas. The area around Syntagma Square, the tourist hub, and Omonia Square, the commercial heart of the city about 1 km (½ mi) northwest, is distinctly European, having been designed by the court architects of King Otho, a Bavarian, in the 19th century. The chic shops and bistros of ritzy Kolonaki nestle at the foot of Mt. Lycabettus, Athens's highest hill (909 feet). Each of Athens's outlying suburbs has a distinctive character: in the north is wealthy, tree-lined Kifissia, once a summer resort for aristocratic Athenians, and in the south and southeast lie Glyfada, Voula, and Vouliagmeni, with their sandy beaches, seaside bars, and lively summer nightlife. Just beyond the city's southern fringes is Piraeus, a bustling port city of waterside fish tavernas and Saronic Gulf views.

Day 8 Mykonos, Greece

Although the fishing boats still go out in good weather, Mykonos largely makes its living from tourism these days. The summer crowds have turned one of the poorest islands in Greece into one of the richest. Old Mykonians complain that their young, who have inherited stores where their grandfathers once sold eggs or wine, get so much rent that they have lost ambition, and in summer sit around pool bars at night with their friends, and hang out in Athens in winter when island life is less scintillating. Put firmly on the map by Jackie O in the 1960s, Mykonos town—called Hora by the locals—remains the Saint-Tropez of the Greek islands. The scenery is memorable, with its whitewashed streets, Little Venice, the Kato Myli ridge of windmills, and Kastro, the town's medieval quarter. Its cubical two- or three-story houses and churches, with their red or blue doors and domes and wooden balconies, have been long celebrated as some of the best examples of classic Cycladic architecture. Luckily, the Greek Archaeological Service decided to preserve the town, even when the Mykonians would have preferred to rebuild, and so the Old Town has been impressively preserved. Pink oleander, scarlet hibiscus, and trailing green pepper trees form a contrast amid the dazzling whiteness, whose frequent renewal with whitewash is required by law. Any visitor who has the pleasure of getting lost in its narrow streets (made all the narrower by the many outdoor stone staircases, which maximize housing space in the crowded village) will appreciate how its confusing layout was designed to foil pirates—if it was designed at all. After Mykonos fell under Turkish rule in 1537, the Ottomans allowed the islanders to arm their vessels against pirates, which had a contradictory effect: many of them found that raiding other islands was more profitable than tilling arid land. At the height of Aegean piracy, Mykonos was the principal headquarters of the corsair fleets—the place where pirates met their fellows, found willing women, and filled out their crews. Eventually the illicit activity evolved into a legitimate and thriving trade network. Morning on Mykonos town's main quay is busy with deliveries, visitors for the Delos boats, lazy breakfasters, and street cleaners dealing with the previous night's mess. In late morning the cruise-boat people arrive, and the shops are all open. In early afternoon, shaded outdoor tavernas are full of diners eating salads (Mykonos's produce is mostly imported); music is absent or kept low. In mid- and late afternoon, the town feels sleepy, since so many people are at the beach, on excursions, or sleeping in their air-conditioned rooms; even some tourist shops close for siesta. By sunset, people have come back from the beach, having taken their showers and rested. At night, the atmosphere in Mykonos ramps up. The cruise-boat people are mostly gone, coughing three-wheelers make no deliveries in the narrow streets, and everyone is dressed sexy for summer and starting to shimmy with the scene. Many shops stay open past midnight, the restaurants fill up, and the bars and discos make ice cubes as fast as they can. Ready to dive in? Begin your tour of Mykonos town (Hora) by starting out at its heart: Mando Mavrogenous Square.

Day 9  Cruising

Day 10 Naples, Italy

Naples, in the Campania region, is Italy's third largest city. Its claim to fame is the spectacular location along one of the world's most splendid bays, backed by the perfect cone of Mount Vesuvius. In addition to its beautiful setting, Naples' surprises with other outstanding attractions such as the Royal Palace, San Carlos Opera House, the impressive National Archaeological Museum and the Castel Nuovo, dating from the 13th-century. The city's central area is best explored on foot. Chaotic traffic conditions make driving around the city a very frustrating experience. Naples provides a convenient starting point for trips to such favored destinations as Pompeii, Herculaneum and Mount Vesuvius. The Isle of Capri can be reached via a 45-minute hydrofoil service. The region of Campania was home to Greeks settlers some 300 years before Rome was founded. Pompeii, too, was a Greek town before being conquered by the Romans during the 5th century BC. It was under the Romans that Pompeii flourished and grew prosperous. When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, the population of 20,000 was wiped out, but dozens of buildings were preserved under layers of cinder more than 20 feet deep. The most important finds from Pompeii are displayed in Naples' National Archaeological Museum. A visit here will no doubt enhance a visit to ancient Pompeii.

Day 11 Civitavecchia, Italy

Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here. Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

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