01 2311868

Call us Mon-Fri 9am to 5:30pm, Saturday 10am to 5pm

Andes & South America/Sapphire Princess
Cruise holidays   >   South America   >   Andes & South America

Sapphire Princess

Andes & South America - 17 night cruise



Cruise only from €1,394

Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Description

Highlights

Gratuities

Dates and Prices

From sumptuous dining to captivating diversions, discover the many riches of this gem

As you set your sights on the wonders of the world, let Sapphire Princess indulge your every whim. Over 700 balconies, world-class gourmet dining and dazzling entertainment options are just the beginning of your sea-going adventure. Dance the night away, enjoy casino gaming or relax and rejuvenate body and mind at the Lotus Spa®.

A Princess MedallionClass holiday offers the ultimate in effortless, personalised cruising. It begins with your Medallion®, a quarter-sized, wearable device that enables everything from touch-free boarding to locating your loved ones anywhere on the ship, as well as enhanced service like having whatever you need, delivered. Spend more time connecting with each other and doing what you love on a Princess MedallionClass® holiday.

MedallionClass® cruising is all about making holidays effortless. Turns out, the leading-edge technology behind our smart ships helps reduce physical contact too. From staggered boarding to contactless payment, you can still enjoy next-level service while staying safe at sea, putting you in complete control of your holidays experience.

Contactless Boarding

Easy, Effortless Embarkation

Start your holidays sooner while maintaining physical distance.

  • Get ready at home by downloading the MedallionClass™ app: App Store | Google Play
  • Choose your arrival window so everyone isn't trying to board at the same time.
  • Ship your Medallion™ to your residence. (Or pick it up in port if you live outside the U.S.)
  • Board faster and go straight to your favourite spot.

Keyless Stateroom Entry

Hands Full? No Problem

You walk along the corridor and voila! Your door unlocks as you approach and even gives you a personalised greeting. You'll enjoy keyless entry with automatic door locks every time you enter your stateroom.

TrulyTouchless™ Payment

Buy Without Cash or Cards

Purchase food, drinks, stuff – even laundry tokens! – touch-free, thanks to MedallionPay™. Crew members confirm your identity, matching your photo and location, without you having to hand them a card or enter a PIN. Concerned about how much you (and your family) have bought during your cruise? Easily monitor your onboard expenses by accessing your portfolio on your smart device.

The Best Wi-Fi at Sea

Stay Connected at Sea

MedallionNet® Wi-Fi lets you access the internet anywhere on board, so you can:

  • Text, video chat, share photos and check email
  • Stream your favourite shows, movies, music and sports
  • Stay in touch with loved ones

Purchase one-device or four-device packages at low daily rates.

Dining Reservations

Dine When, How and Where You Like

Personalise your dining experience with Dine My Way reservations. Customise your dining time for each day, choosing from the main dining room or speciality restaurants. Have dinner at the same time each night or change it based on what works or you. Choose from a world of options while avoiding lines and wait times.

*Reservation times based on venue capacity and availability.

To simplify the tipping process for our passengers, a discretionary gratuity charge will be automatically added to your shipboard account on a daily basis. The daily gratuity amounts are $16.50 per guest for suites, $15.50 per guest for mini-suites and club class, and $14.50 per guest for interior, oceanview, and balcony staterooms. This gratuity will be shared amongst those staff who have helped provide and support your cruise experience, including all waitstaff, stateroom stewards, buffet stewards, and housekeeping staff across the fleet. A 18% gratuity is added to bar charges and dining room wine accounts. 

Date Time Price * Booking
02 December 2022 16:00 €1,394 Call us to book

* Price based on lowest available cruise only fare for double occupancy. Subject to change at any time.


Itinerary*


Day 1 Los Angeles, California, United States

Home of the famous Hollywood sign and Walk of Fame, Los Angeles is the place to visit for anyone interested in film and television and hoping to get a glimpse at some famous actors and artists. Stroll down the Walk and enjoy the glamorous atmosphere and famous surroundings, or take a break on the Santa Monica pier and watch the sun set on the sea.

Day 2  Cruising

Day 3 Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

Cabo San Lucas, a resort city on the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California peninsula, is known for its beaches, water-based activities and nightlife. Playa El Médano is Cabo's main beach, with outdoor restaurants and numerous bars. Past the marina is Land's End promontory, site of Playa del Amor (Lover's Beach) and El Arco, a natural archway in the seacliffs.

Days 4-7  Cruising

Day 8 Puntarenas, Costa Rica

This town is not on the Nicoya Peninsula, but rather on Costa Rica's mainland. It is best known as a cruise-ship port and launching pad for ferries heading southeast to the coast of the Nicoya Peninsula and for cruises sailing out on the Gulf of Nicoya. Puntarenas is also a major fishing port with a lively fish market. The town's reputation suffers from the unimpressive parts you see from your car as you roll through town on the way to the ferry dock. But the town has a lot of character off the main drag, thanks to its illustrious past as an affluent port town and principal vacation spot for San José's wealthy, who arrived by train in the last century. Once the port was moved and roads opened to other beaches, Puntarenas's economy crashed, but it's making a comeback. Sitting on a narrow spit of sand—punta de arenas literally means "point of sand"—that protrudes into the Gulf of Nicoya, the town boasts a beautifully groomed, wide Blue Flag beach with views of the Nicoya Peninsula and spectacular sunsets, along with a public swimming pool, the San Lucas Beach Club, and a marine-life museum. Ticos arrive by bus and car to enjoy the beach and stroll the Paseo de los Turistas, a beachfront promenade lined with tree-shaded concrete benches and seafood restaurants. Crowds of locals, called porteños, cruise by on bicycles, the town's most popular form of transport.

Days 9-11  Cruising

Day 12 Callao, Peru

When people discuss great South American cities, Lima is often overlooked. But Peru's capital can hold its own against its neighbors. It has an oceanfront setting, colonial-era splendor, sophisticated dining, and nonstop nightlife.It's true that the city—clogged with traffic and choked with fumes—doesn't make a good first impression, especially since the airport is in an industrial neighborhood. But wander around the regal edifices surrounding the Plaza de Armas, among the gnarled olive trees of San Isidro's Parque El Olivar, or along the winding lanes in the coastal community of Barranco, and you'll find yourself charmed.In 1535 Francisco Pizarro found the perfect place for the capital of Spain's colonial empire. On a natural port, the so-called Ciudad de los Reyes (City of Kings) allowed Spain to ship home all the gold the conquistador plundered from the Inca. Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and it's safe to say that no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period.When Peru declared its independence from Spain in 1821, the declaration was read in the square that Pizarro had so carefully designed. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas are standing today. Walk a few blocks in any direction for churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was. But the poor state of most buildings attests to the fact that the country's wealthy families have moved to neighborhoods to the south over the past century.The walls that surrounded the city were demolished in 1870, making way for unprecedented growth. A former hacienda became the graceful residential neighborhood of San Isidro. In the early 1920s the construction of tree-lined Avenida Arequipa heralded the development of neighborhoods such as bustling Miraflores and bohemian Barranco.Almost a third of the country's population of 29 million lives in the metropolitan area, many of them in relatively poor conos: newer neighborhoods on the outskirts of the city. Most residents of those neighborhoods moved there from mountain villages during the political violence and poverty that marked the 1980s and '90s, when crime increased dramatically. During the past decade the country has enjoyed peace and steady economic growth, which have been accompanied by many improvements and refurbishment in the city. Residents who used to steer clear of the historic center now stroll along its streets. And many travelers who once would have avoided the city altogether now plan to spend a day here and end up staying two or three.

Day 13 Callao, Peru

When people discuss great South American cities, Lima is often overlooked. But Peru's capital can hold its own against its neighbors. It has an oceanfront setting, colonial-era splendor, sophisticated dining, and nonstop nightlife.It's true that the city—clogged with traffic and choked with fumes—doesn't make a good first impression, especially since the airport is in an industrial neighborhood. But wander around the regal edifices surrounding the Plaza de Armas, among the gnarled olive trees of San Isidro's Parque El Olivar, or along the winding lanes in the coastal community of Barranco, and you'll find yourself charmed.In 1535 Francisco Pizarro found the perfect place for the capital of Spain's colonial empire. On a natural port, the so-called Ciudad de los Reyes (City of Kings) allowed Spain to ship home all the gold the conquistador plundered from the Inca. Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and it's safe to say that no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period.When Peru declared its independence from Spain in 1821, the declaration was read in the square that Pizarro had so carefully designed. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas are standing today. Walk a few blocks in any direction for churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was. But the poor state of most buildings attests to the fact that the country's wealthy families have moved to neighborhoods to the south over the past century.The walls that surrounded the city were demolished in 1870, making way for unprecedented growth. A former hacienda became the graceful residential neighborhood of San Isidro. In the early 1920s the construction of tree-lined Avenida Arequipa heralded the development of neighborhoods such as bustling Miraflores and bohemian Barranco.Almost a third of the country's population of 29 million lives in the metropolitan area, many of them in relatively poor conos: newer neighborhoods on the outskirts of the city. Most residents of those neighborhoods moved there from mountain villages during the political violence and poverty that marked the 1980s and '90s, when crime increased dramatically. During the past decade the country has enjoyed peace and steady economic growth, which have been accompanied by many improvements and refurbishment in the city. Residents who used to steer clear of the historic center now stroll along its streets. And many travelers who once would have avoided the city altogether now plan to spend a day here and end up staying two or three.

Day 14 General San Martin, Peru

Days 15-16  Cruising

Day 17 Coquimbo, Chile

The name Coquimbo is derived from a native Diaguita word meaning 'place of calm waters'. In fact, Charles Darwin had noted that the town was 'remarkable for nothing but its extreme quietness'. Since then, Coquimbo has developed into a bustling port and the region's major commercial and industrial centre from which minerals, fish products and fruits are exported. Used during the colonial period as a port for La Serena, Coquimbo attracted attention from English pirates, including Sir Francis Drake, who visited in 1578. Visitors enjoy strolling around the town, admiring some of the elaborate woodwork handcrafted on buildings by early British and American settlers. These wooden buildings are among Chile's most interesting historical structures. Out of town, the area offers some fine beaches in a desert-like setting. Coquimbo serves as a gateway to the popular resort town of La Serena and trips farther into the Elqui Valley, known as the production centre for Chile's national drink, pisco sour. The valley is also home to several international observatories that take advantage of the region's exceptional atmospheric conditions.

Day 18 San Antonio, Chile

* Itinerary is subject to change. The exact itinerary can be confirmed at the time of booking.

Video provided by 3rd party and complete accuracy can not be guaranteed
Call our experts now

Dublin (01) 2311868
Cork (021) 2066064
Belfast (028) 71878851

Find your Dream Cruise Online



TRAVEL AWARE - STAYING SAFE AND HEALTHY ABROAD

The Department of Foreign Affairs has up-to-date advice for Irish citizens on staying safe and healthy abroad. For more security, local laws, health, passport and visa information see https://www.dfa.ie/travel/travel-advice/ and follow dfatravelwise